U.N. Agency Eyes Curbs On Internet Anonymity

A United Nations agency is quietly drafting technical standards, proposed by the Chinese government, to define methods of tracing the original source of Internet communications and potentially curbing the ability of users to remain anonymous.The U.S. National Security Agency is also participating in the “IP Traceback” drafting group, named Q6/17, which is meeting next week in Geneva to work on the traceback proposal. Members of Q6/17 have declined to release key documents, and meetings are closed to the public.The potential for eroding Internet users’ right to remain anonymous, which is protected by law in the United States and recognized in international law by groups such as the Council of Europe, has alarmed some technologists and privacy advocates. Also affected may be services such as the Tor anonymizing network.
http://news.cnet.com/8301-13578_3-10040152-38.html
http://www.mitechnews.com/articles.asp?id=9229ITU plan to stop DoS attacks could end Net anonymity too [IDG]
The ITU’s Study Group 17 has been considering IP traceback since April 2007, when its vice chairman, Jianyong Chen of Chinese equipment manufacturer ZTE, made a ZTE presentation on the matter, and the group decided in April this year to study it more seriously.The meeting will consider contributions to a draft recommendation from telecommunication researchers in China and South Korea, with the most extensive contribution from Korea’s Telecommunications Technology Association (TTA), a local standards body.TTA has TTA report on the many existing ways to trace back to the source of spoofed traffic.
http://computerworld.com.au/index.php/id;359464215
http://computerworld.co.nz/news.nsf/scrt/42DEFF7A56B41557CC2574C4007C7B6F
http://www.arnnet.com.au/index.php/id;359464215

http://pcworld.idg.com.au/index.php/id;359464215ITU plan to stop DoS attacks could end Net anonymity too
Finding ways to limit DoS attacks and SMS spam by making it harder to spoof the origin of electronic communications is on the agenda at a telecommunications standards meeting next week — but civil rights advocates worry it could put an end to anonymity on the Internet.Making it possible to trace the origin of all Internet traffic “raises grave concerns in terms of facilitating government repression,” said Jim Dempsey, vice president for public policy at the Center for Democracy and Technology. “I’m skeptical of the claimed benefits for security.”At a meeting of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) in Geneva next week, telecoms experts will discuss draft recommendation X.tb-ucr, Trace back use case and requirements, looking at ways to identify the source of packets sent across IP (Internet Protocol) networks.
http://www.infoworld.com/article/08/09/12/DoS_attacks_and_Net_anonymity_1.html
http://www.networkworld.com/news/2008/091208-itu-plan-to-stop-dos.html

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