The Underwater Internet

A wireless world relies on more than cloud technology. Half-century-old cable stations are critical nodes where messages can still be delayed, censored, or intercepted.In 1962, during a period of technological and political transition in the undersea-cable industry, the Keawaula cable station was built on Oahu’s west shore for the landing of the Commonwealth Pacific Cable (COMPAC). As new telephone cables were being strung across the oceans, the geopolitical balance of telecommunications power was shifting from the British to the Americans.While the British “All-Red Line,” a globe-spanning telegraph network, had landed only on colonial territory, the Commonwealth system came aground in the United States. Keawaula interconnected British and American transpacific cables for the first time.
http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2015/05/the-underwater-internet/393161/

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