Tag Archives: South America

ICANN: Registration Now Open for 2018 LAC DNS Forum

ICANN has announced registration is now open for the 2018 LAC DNS Forum to be held in São Paulo, Brazil. The theme of this year’s event, which is part of AbraHosting Day, is “New Technologies and Digital Security.”

Event: 2018 LAC DNS Forum
When: 29 November 2018, 9.00 AM – 5.00 PM
Where: Centro Fecomercio de eventos РṢo Paulo, SP
Registration:
(Portuguese only)
https://eventos.locaweb.com.br/proximos-eventos/abrahosting-day-lac-dns-forum/
Admission: To request an invitation please contact your GSE representative or Daniel Fink – daniel.fink@icann.org

The LAC DNS Forum brings together industry, Internet policy, and technical professionals interested in debating DNS-related issues. The forum also provides an opportunity to engage and network with key players and experts in the field.

The forum is open to anyone interested in issues related to the domain name industry and its potential business opportunities. The target audience includes:

  • Country code top-level domain (ccTLD) registries, registrars, and resellers
  • Generic top-level domain (gTLD) registries, registrars, and resellers
  • Registrants
  • DNS experts
  • gTLD applicants
  • Regional TLD organizations
  • IT and Internet businesses
  • Entrepreneurs
  • Legal and intellectual property firms

This will be the fifth edition of the LAC DNS Forum, which was first held in Buenos Aires, Argentina in 2013. This year’s event is jointly organized by Abrahosting, the Latin American and Caribbean ccTLDs Organization (LACTLD), the Latin American and Caribbean Address Registry (LACNIC), the Internet Society (ISOC), the Public Interest Registry (PIR), and the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN).

New Study Reveals How Internet Exchange Points Spur Internet Growth in Latin America

Internet Society - ISOC - logoJoint Internet Society and Universidad de San Andrés report demonstrates significant cost and performance gains from IXP development in Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, and Ecuador

ISOC Connectivity in Latin America The Role of Internet Exchange report

Download the report

[news release] The Internet Society recently published the results of a study that demonstrates the far-reaching economic and societal benefits of establishing Internet Exchange Points (IXPs) in emerging markets. The study, commissioned by the Internet Society and conducted by Professor Hernan Galperin of the Universidad de San Andrés in Argentina, examined the critical cost and performance benefits of IXPs in Argentina, Brazil, Colombia and Ecuador – countries on the leading edge of Internet growth in Latin America.

Analogous with the role that international airports play in airline traffic, IXPs serve as critical hubs for data traffic exchange in the global Internet infrastructure. Over 350 IXPs around the world enable local Internet Service Providers (ISPs) and Internet backbone carriers to efficiently and cost-effectively exchange Internet traffic. Many emerging markets do not have well-established IXPs, forcing domestic Internet traffic onto long-distance international links, resulting in significantly higher costs and quality of service challenges.

This new study identifies the positive impact that IXPs have made, including reduced telecommunications costs, faster and better local data exchange, and local technical capacity development. For example:

 

  • To date, nine IXPs are operational in Argentina as part of the Cabase system that was created in 1998, connecting over 80 network operators.  Internet transit costs have been reduced from USD $500 per Mbps per month in one city to about USD $40 per Mbps per month.  Service providers have been able to expand their networks and quality of service.
  • In 2004, the Comitê Gestor da Internet (CGI) launched an initiative called PTT Metro to create IXPs across Brazil, starting with their first IXP in São Paulo. As of April 2013, there were 22 IXPs in operation, covering 16 of Brazil’s 26 states. On aggregate, the IXPs associated with the PTT Metro initiative are exchanging over 170Gbps at peak hours, and providing better and faster connectivity to regions of Brazil that had poor Internet service.
  • In Ecuador, international transit costs hover around USD $100 per Mbps per month.  Local traffic can be exchanged at the IXP in Quito (NAP.EC) for as little as USD $1 per Mbps per month. Without an IXP, operators would exchange local traffic through international transit routes and the additional wholesale costs for local ISPs would be USD $7.2 million per year.
  • The Colombian exchange point, NAP Colombia, started in 2000 in response to frequent disruptions in the domestic backhaul network and international links. By exchanging traffic locally, and later by installing content caches at the IXP, local ISPs were able to reduce their dependence on international routes, thus reducing costs and, most importantly, increasing service reliability.

“This study highlights the critical role that IXPs are playing in Latin America – from human capacity and network development to better quality of service and increased uptake of services,” said Sebastian Bellagamba, Regional Bureau Director for Latin America and the Caribbean at the Internet Society. “Offering more than just cost and performance benefits, well-run IXPs serve as a catalyst to dramatically enrich a country’s Internet ecosystem, opening a new world of possibilities with comparably minimal investment. We appreciate the collaboration with Professor Galperin and hope that this study will help inform the dialogue among government, business, and technology leaders of emerging countries to show them the benefits that IXPs can provide for developing partnerships for Internet growth in the region.”

Lead author of the study Hernan Galperin stated, “This report shows the important role that IXPs have played in the development of the Internet in Latin America. This role is likely to become more important as countries in the region address existing challenges such as network security, the improvement in the quality of services, and the reduction in access prices.”

The study was conducted as part of the Internet Society’s Internet Traffic Exchange Programme.  This programme aims to foster robust, efficient, and cost-effective Internet interconnection environments in emerging economies, and furthers the Internet Society’s overall mission to promote the open development, evolution, and use of the Internet for the benefit of all people throughout the world.

Download the full study in:

Funding for this study was provided in part by Google under the IXP Toolkit & Best Practices Grant Project.

About the Internet Society
The Internet Society is the trusted independent source for Internet information and thought leadership from around the world. With its principled vision and substantial technological foundation, the Internet Society promotes open dialogue on Internet policy, technology, and future development among users, companies, governments, and other organizations. Working with its members and Chapters around the world, the Internet Society enables the continued evolution and growth of the Internet for everyone. For more information, visit www.internetsociety.org.

This ISOC news release was sourced from:
www.internetsociety.org/news/new-study-reveals-how-internet-exchange-points-spur-internet-growth-latin-america

Geographic gTLD Applications Taking A Battering

Objections to a number of applications for regional generic Top Level Domains have meant that a few have seemingly bitten the dust.First was the application for .swiss by Swiss International Airlines. The Swiss government objected to this application, and so the airline withdrew its application.Then there were a few South American countries that objected to applications for .patagonia by the outdoor company and .amazon by the online retailer, and both seem to have been rejected.For .patagaonia, Argentina and Chile protested while Brazil and Peru objected to .amazon. All of the countries objected to private companies having control of gTLDs and preventing individuals and organisations in these regions being able to register domains to benefit the regions.The protests against the three gTLD applications have been most prominent at Governmental Advisory Committee. For example, the Swiss government set out its reasons for objecting and said “there is no doubt that the adjective/noun ‘Swiss’ and the management of the corresponding gTLD belong to the Swiss community and should not be controlled by a single private entity.”The governments of Brazil and Peru in objecting to .amazon said the application by the online retailer “has not received support from the governments of the countries in which the Amazon region is located. Therefore, the Governments of Brazil and Peru (GAC Members), with full endorsement of Bolivia, Ecuador and Guyana (Amazonic non GAC members) and also of the Government of Argentina, would like to request that the gTLD application be included in the GAC early warning process.”The governments of Argentina and Chile gave similar reasons for their objections to .patagonia.In the case of both of .amazon and .patagonia, there was only one application for each. But in the case of .swiss, the Swiss government also applied through their Federal Department of the Environment, Transport, Energy and Communications.

Latin American Domain Registrations Continue to Grow

There are now more than 4.86 million domain names registered in the Latin American region, an increase of 1.86 per cent since August and a 17.40 per cent increase year-on-year.

The largest growth in registrations in September was in the country code Top Level Domain for Brazil (.BR) with total registrations growing by 39,496. This was followed by Argentina (.AR – 31,872), Mexico (.MX – 9,806) and Chile (.CL – 3,923).

However on a percentage basis, the ccTLD that showed the greatest growth was Anguilla (.AI) where there was an astonishing increasing in registrations of 1,348 per cent, although this was too the very modest total of 391 registrations. This is reflected by a change in a change in the ccTLD’s terms and conditions with registration of .AI domain names now open to all and not just residents of Anguilla as before.

Following was Guadeloupe (.GD – 4.53%), Mexico (2.79%) and then Guatemala (.GT) and Uruguay (.UG), both with a monthly increase of 2.68 per cent.

Overall, the top five ccTLDs in total registrations remained the same as before. These were .AR with 2,001,844 registrations, .BR (1,848,161), .MX (361,597), .CL (259,914) and .VE (152,799). These were the only five ccTLDs with registrations above 100,000 in Latin America.

America Registry logoTo register domain names for Latin American ccTLDs, check out America Registry here.

The above information was sourced from information provided by LatinoamerICANN at latinoamericann.org/?q=node/2006.

Thanks to NameAction for alerting us to the above information.