Tag Archives: Public Interest Registry

Go Daddy to Auction 42 Single & Two Character .ORG Domains

Go Daddy logoGo Daddy Auctions is to auction off 42 single and two character domain names such as A.ORG from 18 to 28 March. Go Daddy and Public Interest Registry (PIR) have teamed up to auction the domain names.

The .org TLD is reputed to be the most-trusted domain extension, according to a CARAVAN Omnibus domain consumer survey in 2011, large corporations, non-profits, special interest groups and even SMBs can benefit from leveraging .ORG domain names to strengthen their brand message world-wide.

“Companies want a short, snappy domain name, and these dot-ORG names are what you could call the ‘cream of the crop,’” said Go Daddy Director of Domain Name Aftermarkets Paul Nicks. “Go Daddy’s auction platform is extremely user friendly, making it easy to bid-on and track listings both online and via mobile devices. As far as integrating these very valuable names into an organization’s culture, we are offering personalized support to Go Daddy Auction winners to help ensure they are successful.”

Saying why they went with Go Daddy to auction off the domain name, PIR Chief Executive Officer Brian Cute said “Go Daddy met and exceeded all our requirements to handle the sale of our single- and two-character domain names. Go Daddy clearly understands and cares for our brand, and they offer their customers the very best tools required to grow an online presence.”

In the secondary marketplace, past sales of valuable .ORG domain names have included DIY.org for $60,000, AutoInsurance.org for $440,000 and Poker.org, which sold for $1 million. It is expected the historic auction of these single- and two-character .ORG domain names will not only generate high bids, but also help define the aftermarket prior to the introduction of new gTLDs.

To view all 42 .ORG domain names available please visit: www.GoDaddy.com/ORGAuction.

PIR Survey Reveals That Most Americans Are Uninformed About DDoS Attacks

PIR .ORG logo[news release] Whether motivated by an extreme form of free expression or criminal intent, distributed denial-of-service attacks (DDoS attacks) are increasingly commonplace worldwide. Yet there remains a universal misunderstanding amongst the general public of what to do in the event of a DDoS attack.  According to a survey commissioned by Public Interest Registry (PIR) – the not-for-profit operator of the .ORG domain – to better assess Americans’ basic understanding of Internet and network attacks, 85 percent of Americans are uninformed or ill-equipped to deal with a DDoS attack. Moreover, only 17 percent could correctly identify what the acronym DDoS stood for with 77 percent admitting that they had no idea.

Through this survey, it was ultimately revealed that across the board there is a lack of understanding about DDoS attacks despite their increasing frequency. When asked whom should be the first point of call when one experiences a DDoS attack, respondents’ answers varied –a select number correctly identified a DNS Service Provider while the large majority of people said their first point of call would be their local electronic department store, a technology publication, their spouse or children, Google or the police, to name a few.

Additional findings from the survey revealed:

  • Overall, the higher the household income, the more knowledgeable Americans were on the subject. Regional differences (e.g. East Coast vs. Midwest) were marginal.
  • Surprisingly, education levels are not a factor. Respondents with college degrees were no more likely than those who did not complete their degree to correctly identify DDoS or know what to do if an attack ever happened to them.
  • On a whole, men are more informed on the subject than women with 24 percent correctly identifying DDoS as a type of network attack in comparison to their female counterparts’ 10 percent. Additionally, 20 percent of men compared to 11 percent of women would know what to do in the event of a DDoS attack.
  • In the event of a DDoS attack, only 36 percent of Americans would know where to turn to for advice. Of that number, nearly half of Americans 65-years-old and up would know where to seek help compared to only 28 percent of 18-24 year-olds.

“At PIR, we pride ourselves on being a name that people trust, and we’re committed to helping strengthen the safety and security of the Internet by providing the information people need to protect themselves from these attacks,” said Brian Cute, CEO of Public Interest Registry. “These findings only show that there is real misunderstanding about DDoS across all ages and levels of expertise, so we must do our part to engage with other Internet service providers and registry operators worldwide to discuss how we can be better prepared and prevent future attacks.  It’s in all of our interests – public and individual – to ensure that the Internet remains a safe and protected place for all users.”

In an effort to fuel the discussion about online attacks amongst, organizations and individuals, Public Interest Registry and NY Tech will be hosting “Mitigating DDoS Attacks: Best Practices for an Evolving Threat Landscape” – a forum on December 5 to help generate a thoughtful conversation on how Internet users can protect ourselves from DDoS attacks. Participants in the forum are experts from Google, Symantec, Afilias, Neustar, EFF, MAAWG, and De Natris Consult. For more information about the event (including registration and remote participation details) and the survey, please visit pir.org/why/security/ddos.

This PIR news release was sourced from:
pir.org/pr/2012/ddos

.ORG Releases 94 Never-Registered One- and Two-Character Domains

Public Interest Registry .ORG logo[news release] Much like real estate, Internet “curb appeal” – otherwise known as an Internet address – can help optimize a company or organization’s online branding or outreach efforts. Today, Public Interest Registry (PIR) – the not-for-profit operator of the .ORG domain, one of the original generic top-level domains with over 10 million registrations – will release 94 previously unregistered one- to two-character .ORG addresses – the shortest and perhaps most memorable domain names available. Through a partnership with Go Daddy and eNom, the addresses will be made available through an allocation process to companies and organizations who respect the inherent trust and value of the .ORG brand.

 

Referred to as “Project94,” the list of available names includes the likes of A.ORG, O.ORG, 7.ORG, and PJ.ORG. When PIR first took over operation of the .ORG domain in 2003, these names were reserved for future allocation and deemed unavailable for immediate registration. Now, PIR is releasing these addresses in response to community interest. With some web addresses surpassing 20 characters, the one- and two-letter domain names carry vast branding and marketing potential due to their brevity and memorability. They also carry the inherent trust and reliability for which the .ORG domain is known.

“Due to the Internet’s unquestionable popularity and expansion over the past 25 years, it’s rare to have the opportunity to register brief domain names that consist of one to two letters only. From our perspective, this list boasts great potential for interested and qualified registrants who are looking to boost and protect their online brand,” said Brian Cute, CEO of Public Interest Registry. “However, with great opportunity comes great responsibility, and we want to ensure that we are rolling out these names in a manner that upholds the standards that have become intrinsic to the .ORG domain. Both GoDaddy and eNom understand .ORG’s core mission, and we are confident that they will serve as valued partners in this process.”

The proceeds from Project94 will be directed to programs that enhance the open development and security of the Internet, particularly in technologically underserved parts of the world.  One specific program is expected to be an initiative to drive the adoption of Domain Name System Security Extensions (DNSSEC) among the broader Internet user community.

Overall, an interested registrant will need to demonstrate its commitment to the .ORG brand values, have a distinct plan for how it proposes to use the new domain, and have the resources to execute its proposed plans. Go Daddy and eNom will jointly facilitate all aspects of the allocation process – from handling the outreach to prospective buyers and managing auctions and handling trademark issues.

“Domain names are, indeed, like ‘21st century real estate,’ more than just an address on the Web, they are an online identity,” said Go Daddy Director of Domain Name Aftermarkets Paul Nicks. “As part of this historic opportunity we look forward to assisting our customers with integrating these very valuable names into their organization’s culture.”

“As a long-time partner of The Public Interest Registry, we are very pleased to be able to help make these .ORG domains available for the first time to consumers,” said Taryn Naidu, EVP, eNom/Demand Media. “These additions both reflect and reinforce the value of the .ORG brand, and will be a truly memorable event in the domain name space.”

The “Project94” allocation officially kicks-off today. For more information on PIR’s “Project94,” go to www.project94.org or www.pir.org.

This PIR news release was sourced from:
pir.org/pr/2012/project94

.ORG Sixth Largest TLD As Registrations Grow Strongly

Public Interest Registry .ORG logoThe number of .ORG domain names grew by 7.7 per cent in the first half of 2012 compared to the same period in 2011, with the total number of domains registered totalling 9.9 million at the end of June, the Public Interest Registry revealed in its latest bi-annual report The Dashboard.

The number of .ORG domain names now totals 10.064 million with the ten millionth registration happening on 24 June according to a PIR news release dated 11 July. So either registrations temporarily went backwards or there are several ways to count .ORG domain names!

The report also notes the number of registered .ORG domain names increased from 3.9 million in 2006 to 9.9 million by the end of June 2012 – a net gain of 305,948 for the first half of the year and an increase of 154 percent over seven years.

The largest TLD globally is naturally .COM with around 104.127m domain names registered. Second is .DE (Germany) with 15.159m registrations then .NET (14.767m). Following is .TK (Tokelau – 10.5m), .UK (United Kingdom – 10.179m), .ORG (10.055m), .INFO (8.118m).NL (Netherlands – 5.015m), .RU (Russian Federation – 3.928m), .EU (European Union – 3.644m) and then .BR (3m).

The blended renewal rate for .ORG, the average renewal rate from the first to the third year, of existing .ORG websites for the first half of 2012 was 75.4 per cent.

PIR has also applied for six new top level domains: .NGO, .ONG and four internationalised domains that translate into “organisation,” “org” or “structured organisation” in Devanagari, Cyrillic and Chinese-simplified scripts.

“We have seen tremendous growth of the .ORG domain over the last few years, underscoring the fact that .ORG remains the go-to online home for individuals and companies advancing their cause or mission,” said Brian Cute, CEO of Public Interest Registry. “What’s more is that the year ahead also promises to be an exciting one for PIR. Not only will we remain focused on continuing to expand the .ORG domain globally and in new markets such as India, Russia and China, but we will also be introducing complementary domain options – such as .NGO or .ONG – that will, like .ORG, serve as trusted online venues for nonprofit and nongovernmental communities worldwide.”

For more information on “The Dashboard” or to download a copy, see pir.org/news

PIR Files Applications to Create and Manage .NGO and .ONG Domains

Public Interest Registry .ORG logo[news release]  Public Interest Registry (PIR) – the not-for-profit operator of the .ORG domain – has formally submitted its applications to the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) for the .NGO and .ONG domain extensions. PIR applied for the creation and management of the new top-level domains (TLDs) as part of ICANN’s global Internet expansion initiative which would go into effect as early as 2013.

As the current manager of the .ORG domain – home to more than 9.8 million web addresses worldwide, PIR has served the interests of not-for-profit and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) since its inception in 2002. Now, by applying to establish and operate the .NGO and .ONG domains, PIR is poised to continue and expand its position as an advocate for these communities by providing an exclusive domain extension for NGOs looking for immediate recognition online and broader opportunities for public engagement, funding and partnerships.

“The ‘NGO’ term holds great weight globally and sets these organizations apart from commercial or governmental entities,” said Brian Cute, CEO of Public Interest Registry. “After meeting with hundreds of organizations worldwide to learn more about their missions and to determine how we, as their current registry, could better serve their communities, we found that no matter the location, NGOs desired a definitive online presence to help manage members, strengthen fundraising campaigns and find potential partners and donors. Those key findings reinforced our mission and stand at the heart of our .NGO and .ONG applications.”

As part of PIR’s commitment to the NGO community, PIR will launch the NGO Community Program, which consists of a variety of activities all designed to help those in the NGO Community to more securely and effectively use the Internet to better accomplish their mission, with a special focus on those NGOs located in developing countries and technologically underserved areas of the world.

Added Mr. Cute: “The decision to invest in this community was a natural one. We don’t want to be viewed simply as a domain registry, but instead as a trusted and valuable partner to the NGO Community – one that can empower organizations to reach their full potential.”

PIR’s application for .NGO is accompanied by .ONG, which serves as a linguistic expression of “Non-Governmental Organization.” Linguistic expressions include French: “Organisation Non Gouvernementale,” Spanish: “Organizacion No Gubernamental,” and Portuguese: “Organizacao Nao Governamental.”

“.NGO and .ONG will provide global organizations with trusted venues to help engage their communities and broaden their reach, especially in a time when online philanthropy is just as influential and effective as an organization’s offline efforts,” said Osama Manzar, Founder & Director of the Digital Empowerment Foundation, a Delhi, India based not-for-profit organization. “The .NGO or .ONG stamp at the end of a web address will, in essence, provide instant credibility for legitimate organizations hoping to introduce or expand their online presences.”

ICANN plans to announce all TLD applicants in June, 2012 and will review all applications including .NGO and .ONG during a “batching process” in the months ahead. For more information on PIR’s pursuit of .NGO and .ONG and to keep up with important updates, subscribe to our newsletter at www.ngotld.org.

This Public Interest Registry news release was sourced from:
pir.org/pr/2012/ngofiled

PIR Aims To Broaden International Reach With Creation of Cyrillic, Chinese and Devanagari TLDs

Public Interest Registry .ORG logo[news release] Public Interest Registry (PIR) – the not-for-profit operator of the .ORG domain – today applied for the creation and management of four internationalized domain names (IDNs) recognized as .ORG in non-Latin-based scripts. As part of its application to the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), PIR submitted for the generic top-level domains (gTLDs) that translate “organization,” “org” or “structured organization” into Devanagari, Cyrillic and Chinese-simplified scripts. The four applications- one in Devenagari, one in Cyrillic, and two in simplified Chinese- were filed as part of ICANN’s global Internet expansion initiative which will go into effect as early as 2013.

“With each IDN launch, the Internet takes a big step toward becoming a truly global entity,” said Brian Cute, CEO of Public Interest Registry. “These specific IDNs help ensure the Internet’s accessibility and availability to millions of individuals worldwide – especially those who do not speak Latin-based languages like English, French, German and Spanish, and who were previously offline or only use the Internet in a limited way.”

PIR took the first step in supporting non-English languages in 2005 through the introduction of IDNs at the second level – IDNs where the name (left of the dot) is in a non-English language and the gTLD (right of the dot) remains in English. While these second-level IDNs proved useful in countries such as Sweden, Denmark, Hungary, Iceland, Poland and Korea (among others), they do not directly address communities who use languages such as Arabic or Chinese that are either character-driven or read right to left. These four new IDNs will provide a holistic, in-language domain name for native speakers of Devanagari, Cyrillic and Chinese, resulting in a consistent end-user experience and overall adoption of IDNs.

“Conservative estimates show that at least 20 percent of the world’s population speaks in a language derived from these scripts,” added Mr. Cute. “The Chinese IDN, for example, will make the Internet more user-friendly by enabling relevant Internet users to write a domain name or URL exactly the way it is supposed to be written in its native language – without substitution or translation.”

In addition to applying for the four IDNs, PIR also submitted an application for the creation and management of the .NGO and .ONG domain names. Since its inception in 2002, PIR has served the interests of not-for-profit and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) online. The registry plans to expand its position as an advocate for these communities by providing an exclusive domain extension for NGOs looking for immediate recognition online and broader opportunities for public engagement, funding and partnerships.

ICANN plans to announce all TLD applicants in June and will review all applications during a “batching process” in the months ahead. For more information on PIR, please visit www.pir.org.

This PIR news release was sourced from:
pir.org/pr/2012/idnsfiled

Call for Nominations to the Public Interest Registry .ORG Advisory Council

Call for Nominations to the Public Interest Registry .ORG Advisory Council
Interested individuals are encouraged to submit nominations, including self-nominations. A nomination statement of approximately 400 words should include details of the nominee’s experience with the Internet, commitment to promoting the noncommercial use of the Internet, understanding of the technical or policy issues facing the .ORG registry, and perspectives regarding the needs of the .ORG community. A current biography and digital photograph also are requested.
http://www.circleid.com/posts/pir_public_interest_registry_org_advisory_council/

PIR Launches First-Ever .ORG Television Commercial In India

Public Interest Registry .ORG logo[news release] Public Interest Registry (PIR) – the not-for-profit operator of the .ORG domain – today aired its first-ever television commercial for the .ORG domain. Developed in conjunction with BigRock, a leading provider of web infrastructure solutions, the ad campaign reinforces PIR’s overall commitment to raising awareness of the domain as an invaluable online communications platform for emerging businesses in India.

For the past 26 years, .ORG has long-stood as the recognized Internet address of choice for individuals, companies and organizations looking to engage and mobilize their communities. In recent years, .ORG’s popularity and growth has surged in international markets with roughly 40 percent of the current 9.8 million .ORG registrations originating in communities outside of the United States. Since 2004, international registration of .ORG grew by 196 percent. In India alone, the domain grew by 15 percent over the past year.

“As we continue to see tremendous growth in registrations coming from outside of the U.S., we are pleased to have the opportunity to work with BigRock to promote .ORG in their market,” said Brian Cute, CEO of Public Interest Registry. “India is a country with rapidly expanding Internet use and rising economic growth. The timing is ripe to showcase how .ORG and its trusted reputation can further a company’s long-term goals online.”

“The values of .ORG are trust, reliability, and all the positive attributes that define an organization which cares about its stakeholders. The India of the future has a need for many more such organizations and BigRock is proud to be reaching out to millions of Indian businesses with this powerful message,” said Bhavin Turakhia, Founder , BigRock. The .ORG commercials will run in India starting today and ending in mid-May. To view PIR and BigRock’s Indian Television commercials, please click on the following links: Badshahi Election Inks and Nambiar Aglet.

This news release was sourced from:
pir.org/pr/2012/bigrock

America Registry logoTo register your .ORG domain name, check out America Registry here.

.ORG Registrations Rise 10% in 2011 To Nearing 10 Million

.ORG registrations grew by 9.9 per cent in 2011, reaching 9.6 million total domains under management by the end of 2011 — a net gain of 411,002 for the second half of the year.

The information was provided in the bi-annual domain name report published by the Public Interest Registry, “The Dashboard.”

According to the most recent “The Dashboard”:

  • the renewal rate of existing .ORG websites for the second half of 2011 was 75.4 percent
  • .ORG has maintained consistent growth between nine and 10 per cent annually for the past three years
  • ORG domains under management rose from 3.9 million in 2005 to 9.6 million in 2011 — an increase of 146 percent in seven years
  • North America and Europe continue to represent the regions with the most .ORG registrations, with Australia, China and Japan also making the top 10 country list for the second half of 2011.

As of end December, .ORG was the third largest generic Top Level Domain (gTLD), trailing .COM and .NET with around 98.9 million and 14.3 million domains under management respectively. Overall it was the fifth largest TLD, also trailing the country code Top Level Domains (ccTLDs) of Germany (.DE) with 14.7 million registrations and the United Kingdom (.UK) with 14.7 million and 9.8 million domains under management respectively.

.ORG has kept quite a distinctive profile unlike other TLDs given its community background. Of all registrations, clubs and groups make up 16 per cent of all registrations. The categorisation is done through indexing by leading search engines using keywords for specific subject categories.

Also ranking highly are the categories of charities, schools and environmental groups, each making up 15 per cent of all registrations while “wikis and open source” make up 13 per cent of all registrations.

Registrations are also predominately from the United States, with 59 per cent of all registrations coming from the US. The next largest country of origin for registrants is Germany with five per cent of registrations while next are the United Kingdom and Canada (4% each) followed by France and Austria with three per cent each.

“With Internet usage continuing to surge worldwide, and individuals and organizations alike placing even greater importance on doing good and promoting their passions online, it’s no surprise that .ORG continued to see consistent and substantial growth during the second half of 2011,” said Brian Cute, CEO of The Public Interest Registry. “We look forward to maintaining this consistent growth, as well as expanding globally in 2012.”

Also highlighted in “The Dashboard” for the second half of 2011 is PIR’s announcement of its intention to pursue the new domain extension, .NGO. This initiative is a major opportunity for non-governmental organisations (NGOs), a community that depends on those three letters to set itself apart from commercial or governmental bodies. PIR believes that NGOs worldwide would benefit from .NGO as an exclusive signature online where they can effectively differentiate themselves and advance their missions. As part of this initiative, PIR intends to make the latest online innovations accessible to NGOs in both developed and developing countries.

In addition, “The Dashboard” underlines PIR’s continued commitment to pioneer and advocate for advanced security standards for the Internet and for finding collaborative solutions to such hot-button issues as copyright infringement and online piracy while still promoting an open, global and unfettered Internet.

For more information on “The Dashboard” or to download a copy, please visit pir.org/news/dashboard.

America Registry logoTo register your .ORG domain name, check out America Registry here.

.ORG Continues Rapid Growth With 10% In 12 Months

The latest Dashboard report from the Public Interest Registry shows the TLD continues rapid growth with an increase in active registrations of 10.1 per cent year on year, and four per cent or over 350,000, in the six months, to the end of June.The growth sees .ORG registrations total 9.2 million at the end of June with North America (63%) and the European Union (23%) accounting for the regions with the most registrations. In 2011, Italy and Japan entered the list of the top ten countries from where registrations originated. Other countries in the top ten are Germany, United Kingdom, Canada, France, Netherlands, Spain and China. In total 11 per cent of registrations come from the Asia pacific, two per cent from Latin America and the Caribbean one per cent from Africa.”Yet again, we’re seeing significant growth of the .ORG domain as web users worldwide continue to see the value in using a trusted, secure domain to educate, mobilize and empower their communities,” said Brian Cute, CEO of .ORG, The Public Interest Registry. “By June 2011, the .ORG domain reached 9.2 million domains under management, a monumental figure compared to the 3.9 million in 2005. These numbers are clear indicators that .ORG is well-positioned to take advantage of the Internet growth that we continue to see occur.”As part of its most recent Dashboard report, the Public Interest Registry commissioned research on the health and status of traditional websites versus corporate social media. The study indicated that 81 per cent of web surfers still chose an organisation’s website – over Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and LinkedIn – as the most trustworthy place to find information.Moreover, almost half of all respondents – 47 per cent – would choose .ORG over other domain extensions to post information on a cause they are passionate about. And during a time of crisis, 39 per cent of Americans turn to a .ORG website for information first.As predicted when asked which word people most commonly associate with the .ORG domain, the most common response was “non profits” with 52 per cent of responses. Other responses were:

  • 12 per cent associate .ORG with “trusted”
  • 4 per cent associate .ORG with “exclusive”
  • 21 per cent associate .ORG with all of the above
  • 9 per cent associate it with none of the above.

To download the full report, see:
pir.org/pdf/dashboard_1H_2011.pdf