Tag Archives: .org

ICANN: Proposed Renewal of .ORG gTLD Registry Agreement

ICANN logoPurpose (Brief): ICANN is posting today for public comment the proposed renewal of the 2008 .ORG Registry Agreement. The proposal is a result of discussions between ICANN and Public Interest Registry, and will be considered by ICANN after public comment.
Current Status: Per recent amendment #5, the current agreement will expire on 31 August 2013.
Next Steps: After review of the public comments received, ICANN will consider the proposed .ORG Registry Agreement for renewal.
Detailed Information
Section I: Description, Explanation, and Purpose: 

ICANN is posting today for public comment the proposed renewal of the 2008 .ORG Registry Agreement. The proposal is a result of discussions between ICANN and Public Interest Registry, and will be considered by ICANN after public comment. Per recent amendment #5, the current agreement will expire on 31 August 2013.

The current registry agreement for .ORG provides for presumptive renewal so long as certain requirements are met. The agreement also provides that upon renewal, changes may be made to render the terms similar to other comparable agreements. The proposed renewal agreement includes modified provisions to make the agreement in line with other comparable agreements, as well as additional provisions that are currently proposed in the final draft of the New gTLD Registry Agreement posted for public comment.

Included in the proposed renewal agreement are the following provisions:

  • Threats to Security and Stability: A new provision has been added to allow the registry operator to temporarily prevent the registration of one or more names in the TLD in order to respond to an imminent threat to the security and/or stability of the TLD or the Internet.
  • Use of Registrars Accredited Under the 2013 RAA: A new provision is included to require the registry operator to amend its Registry-Registry Agreement to require registrars to use the 2013 RAA if registrars representing 67% of the registrations in the TLD sign the 2013 RAA. If the remaining registrars do not sign the amended Registry-Registrar Agreement requiring registrars to become a party to the final 2013 RAA within a certain time period, then the registrars’ access to the TLD registry system will be suspended (that is, those registrars will not be permitted to add new registrations). This requirement is dependent upon the registry operators of identified comparable gTLDs also submitting similar requests to amend their Registry-Registrar Agreements.
  • Emergency Transition provisions: A new provision proposed in the New gTLD Registry Agreement is included in the renewal agreement to provide for emergency transition in the event the registry is unable to sustain certain critical registry functions for a period of time.
  • Code of Conduct: The registry operator will be required to comply with the Registry Code of Conduct as proposed in the New gTLD Registry Agreement.
  • Resolution of Disputes: The dispute resolution procedures were updated similar to the New gTLD Registry Agreement to require the parties to attempt to resolve the dispute through mediation before they may initiate arbitration.
  • WHOIS: The WHOIS output is required to be compatible with ICANN‘s common interface for WHOIS (InterNIC), and if requested by ICANN, the registry operator must provide a link on its website to a webpage designed by ICANN containing WHOIS policy and education materials.
  • Cross-ownership Restrictions: The renewal agreement lifts restrictions on cross-ownership of registry operators and registrars or registrar resellers.

Posted for public comment are both clean and “redline” versions of the agreement and modified appendices as follows:

Contractual Compliance Review: As part of the renewal process, ICANN conducted a review of recent .ORG Registry Agreement performance. The compliance review covered areas including: Timeliness and Content of Monthly Reports; Add Grace Period Limits Policy; Bulk Zone File Requirements; and Payment of Required Fees.

The Public Interest Registry was found to be in substantial compliance with their contractual requirements. The assessments can be found at: www.icann.org/en/resources/compliance/reports/operator-pir-org-03jun13-en.pdf [PDF, 267 KB]

Section II: Background: 

ICANN and Public Interest Registry entered into Registry Agreements on 8 December 2008 for the operation of the .ORG top level domain. The current .ORG agreement may be viewed at: www.icann.org/en/about/agreements/registries/org

Section III: Document and Resource Links: 
Comment / Reply Periods (*)
Comment Open Date:
21 June 2013
Comment Close Date:
21 July 2013 – 23:59 UTC
Reply Open Date:
22 July 2013
Reply Close Date:
12 August 2013 – 23:59 UTC
Important Information Links

This ICANN announcement was sourced from:
www.icann.org/en/news/public-comment/org-renewal-21jun13-en.htm

EURid Quarterly Report Shows 80% Of .EU Domains Renewed In 2012

EURid logoOn average, 80% of .eu domain names were renewed in 2012, according to the latest progress report from the .eu registry EURid as registrations grew at 5.4 percent year-on-year to 3.7 million active registrations. This is the sixth year running that .eu has maintained such a high renewal rate, which EURid says indicates .eu domain name holders are a loyal group.

The TLD finished the quarter, and the year, with 3.7 million registrations.

“I consider a growth rate that is comparable to 2011 (5.5%) to be a notable achievement, particularly in light of the on-going global economic crisis,” commented EURid General Manager, Marc Van Wesemael.

During Q4 2012, there were 230,752 new .eu registrations. Of these, 7 184, or 3 percent, were multiyear registrations (registrations for two years or more). Compared with Q3 2012, the number of multiyear registrations increased by 46 percent, signifying that a growing number domain name holders plan to hold onto their .eu domains for the foreseeable future.

The total number of .eu registrations increased in 22 of the 27 EU Member States. Bulgaria, Belgium, Slovenia, Lithuania and Finland all saw growth of more than 5 percent.

The growth rate compares to the total base of domain names that increased by 12 percent in the year to the end of the third quarter in 2012, while the number of ccTLD registrations increased by 20.7 percent, according to the latest Verisign Domain Name Brief, while combined .com and .net domains increased by 7.1 percent.

Overall, .eu ranks as the eleventh largest TLD. The largest is .com with 107.6 million registrations followed by .de (Germany) with 15.4 million, .net (15m) and then probably .tk (Tokelau), which gives away its domains for free and probably over 13 million registrations and .cn (China) which is growing rapidly again with 13.4 million.

Following is .uk (United Kingdom) and .org, both with 10.2 million, .info (6.9m), .nl (Netherlands – 5.2m), .ru (Russian Federation – 4.4m) and then .eu.

The report also outlines a new EURid-UNESCO Insights report titled, “The EURid-UNESCO world report on Internationalised Domain Names deployment 2012″ that analyses the growth of multilingualism on the Internet and the factors that contribute towards that growth, including the use of Internationalised Domain Names (IDNs).

Also, EURid tested its crisis management capabilities and successfully ran an unannounced Business Continuity Plan (BCP) exercise in December 2012. The exercise focused on switching the EPP, Registrar Extranet, Registrar DAS and Registrar WHOIS services from one data centre to another and back again. The impact on the registrar infrastructure was minimal – a temporary interruption of approximately 15 minutes.

The full EURid Quarterly Progress Report for the fourth quarter 2012 is available for download at www.eurid.eu/en/about-us/publications/quarterly-progress-reports.

Domain registration statistics were sourced from:

Historic Single- & Two-Character .ORG Auction to Bring Great Names Online

Go Daddy logo[news release] Go Daddy and Public Interest Registry (PIR) are teaming up to auction 42 valuable single- and two-character domain names like I.ORG, S.ORG and TS.ORG on GoDaddy.com. Short and memorable, these domain names are expected to demand high interest in the aftermarket.

The historic auction of the 42 names is set launch March 18, 2013 and last 10 days. Pre-approval is required to participate in domain bidding – to submit an application visit Go Daddy Auctions.

The .ORG domain name extension is one of the Internet’s original top-level domains and one of the most trusted, according to a CARAVAN Omnibus domain consumer survey. Large corporations, non-profits, special interest groups and even SMBs can benefit from leveraging .ORG domain names to strengthen their brand message.

“We are excited for Go Daddy to begin the sale of our single- and two-character domain names,” said PIR Chief Executive Officer Brian Cute. “Throughout this process, Go Daddy has been a tremendous partner because they truly understand the value of the .ORG brand.”

Ninety-three percent of consumers want to know what companies are doing to make the world a better place, according to a Cone/Echo Global CR study. The .ORG domain name extension is widely associated with serving the public interest and is a powerful tool for companies to communicate their commitment to social responsibility.

Combined with Go Daddy’s industry-leading products and unparalleled customer support, businesses can quickly and easily supplement their image and better leverage their online performance.

“Businesses looking for short, effective domain names are going to love the .ORG auction,” said Go Daddy Director of Domain Name Aftermarkets Paul Nicks. “These names are the best of the best. I expect the auction of these single- and two-character domain names will not only generate high interest, but also help define the aftermarket prior to the introduction of new gTLDs later this year.”

To view all 42 .ORG domain names available please visit: www.GoDaddy.com/ORGAuction.

This Go Daddy news release was sourced from:
www.godaddy.com/news/article/historic-single-two-character-org-auction-to-bring-great-names-online.aspx

.ORG Registrations Increase 12% In Second Half 2012

PIR .ORG logoThe number of .org domain names registered increased by 11.9 percent in the second half of 2012 to over 10.1 million according to the latest Dashbord report from the Public Interest Registry, making .org the seventh largest TLD.

The Public Interest Registry is the not-for-profit operator of the .org domain and has released the results of its bi-annual domain name report, “The Dashboard,” detailing the increased growth of .org from July to December.

Other findings outlined in “The Dashboard” include:

  • the number of .org domains under registration (DUM) grew by 4.3 percent in 2012, growing 1.1 percent from July to December.
  • .org experienced a net gain of 416,301 registrations in 2012.
  • .org’s DUM has more than doubled during the past seven years, increasing from 3.9 million in 2005.

Using the latest figures, .com is the largest TLD globally, currently with 107.274 million registrations, followed by .de (Germany) with 15.348 million, .net with 14.967 million, .cn (China) with 13.41m then .tk (Tokelau), although actual figures are hard to come by for the TLD whose domains are given away for free.

Following is .uk (United Kingdom) with 10.24m, .org (10.190m), .info (6.94m), .nl (Netherlands – 5.186m) and rounding out the top ten is .ru (Russian Federation – 4.398m).

“The Dashboard” also revealed strong growth outside of .ORG’s core markets, North America and Europe. From 2010 to 2012, newly created .ORG domain names in Asia, Australia and the Pacific Region grew by 47 percent, followed by Latin America at 25 percent and Africa at 23 percent. Top five international markets for .ORG registrants by country include the United Kingdom, Germany, Canada, Australia, and France.

“We had a very successful 2012, which included reaching a remarkable milestone with the registration of our 10 millionth .ORG domain,” said Brian Cute, CEO of Public Interest Registry, “The outlook for 2013 looks just as bright both domestically and abroad. As we are experiencing rapid growth in various countries, PIR is pursing initiatives to increase support for international markets, which includes introducing new domain options for communities worldwide.”

Public Interest Registry details its advancements and preparations for the development of the .NGO and .ONG domains in “The Dashboard.” Public Interest Registry’s applications to manage the to-be-launched top-level domains are currently under evaluation with the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), as are four other internationalized domains that translate into “organization,” “org” or “structured organization” in Devanagari, Cyrillic and Chinese-simplified scripts.

The Dashboard also illustrates the diversity of .ORG registrants, annual renewal rates and growth compared to other domains. In addition, the registry discusses its commitment to enhancing Internet security and preserving the open Internet.

For more information on “The Dashboard” or to download a copy, please visit pir.org/news.

Figures used for TLD registrations statistics include registrarstats.com, Verisign’s Domain Name Industry Brief and individual registry websites.

Afilias Advises ICANN Of 10% .INFO Registry Fee Hike

Dot Info logoAfilias has advised ICANN they will be increasing the registry fee, the fee charged to registrars, by ten percent as of 1 September 2013 to $8.16 per year, pursuant to the .info registry agreement. The fee was increased to $7.42 in July 2011.

The announcement follows Neustar advising ICANN they will be increasing the .biz registry fee by ten percent as of 1 September 2013 to $8.63 per year and the Public Interest Registry who announced they would be increasing the registry fee for .org domains to $8.25.

And for .com, the National Telecommunications and Information Administration has capped the maximum registry fee to $7.85 unless Verisign is able to demonstrate it is in the public interest to increase the fee.

BIZ Domains To Increase 10% In September

Neustar logoNeustar has written to ICANN to advise it will be increasing the domain name registry fee for .biz domains by ten percent as of 1 September 2013, compared to an increase of 7.5 percent in 2012.

The fee will increase from the current $7.85 to a maximum of $8.63 per year, an increase of $0.78. In 2012 the increase was $0.55.

This domain name registry fee is that charged by the registry to registrars and hence charges to registrants will normally be somewhat higher.

The increase compares to the increase announced by the Public Interest Registry for .org domains, who announced in December 2012 the registry fee would increase to $8.25. The fee was previously increased to $7.21 in April 2011.

And for .com, the National Telecommunications and Information Administration has capped the maximum registry fee to $7.85 unless Verisign is able to demonstrate it is in the public interest to increase the fee.

Go Daddy to Auction 42 Single & Two Character .ORG Domains

Go Daddy logoGo Daddy Auctions is to auction off 42 single and two character domain names such as A.ORG from 18 to 28 March. Go Daddy and Public Interest Registry (PIR) have teamed up to auction the domain names.

The .org TLD is reputed to be the most-trusted domain extension, according to a CARAVAN Omnibus domain consumer survey in 2011, large corporations, non-profits, special interest groups and even SMBs can benefit from leveraging .ORG domain names to strengthen their brand message world-wide.

“Companies want a short, snappy domain name, and these dot-ORG names are what you could call the ‘cream of the crop,’” said Go Daddy Director of Domain Name Aftermarkets Paul Nicks. “Go Daddy’s auction platform is extremely user friendly, making it easy to bid-on and track listings both online and via mobile devices. As far as integrating these very valuable names into an organization’s culture, we are offering personalized support to Go Daddy Auction winners to help ensure they are successful.”

Saying why they went with Go Daddy to auction off the domain name, PIR Chief Executive Officer Brian Cute said “Go Daddy met and exceeded all our requirements to handle the sale of our single- and two-character domain names. Go Daddy clearly understands and cares for our brand, and they offer their customers the very best tools required to grow an online presence.”

In the secondary marketplace, past sales of valuable .ORG domain names have included DIY.org for $60,000, AutoInsurance.org for $440,000 and Poker.org, which sold for $1 million. It is expected the historic auction of these single- and two-character .ORG domain names will not only generate high bids, but also help define the aftermarket prior to the introduction of new gTLDs.

To view all 42 .ORG domain names available please visit: www.GoDaddy.com/ORGAuction.

.FR Reaches 2.5m Registrations And Top 5 Fastest Growing ccTLDs

AFNIC logoThe French ccTLD, .FR, reached 2.5 million domain name registrations this week, and achieved the milestone relatively quickly as it is among the top five ccTLDs when it comes to growth.

Growing at 16 percent per annum, .FR has achieved significant growth in recent years following the liberalisation of registration policies allowing first individuals to register domain names, and now people and businesses within Europe.

In September .fr TLD had just over one third (34.1%) of the market share in France, an increase of almost two pecentage points year on year. And the 2.5 millionth registration was borders-collie.fr, which unsurprisingly went to a dog breeder.

However .fr still has some way to go to reach the top ten top level domains, trailing .com, the world’s largest TLD with 105.79 million registered domain names and .de (Germany) the world’s largest ccTLD, and second largest TLD, with 15.27 million registered domain names.

Next is .net with 14.88 million registrations, .tk (Tokelau – approximately 13 million), .uk (United Kingdom – 10.24m), .org (10.10m), .info (7.24m), .nl (5.12m), .ru (Russia – 4.16m), .cn (China – 3.98m) and then, recently dropping out of the top ten, .eu, with 3.70m.

TLD registration statistics come from Registrar Stats while ccTLD statistics come from registry websites.

.EU Registrations Continue To Grow Strongly

Registrations of .eu (European Union) domain names grew by more than seven percent in Q3 2012 year over year for the second consecutive quarter, the latest progress report from the .eu registry, EURid says. The third quarter’s net growth rate of 7.4 percent was consistent with Q2’s 7.6 percent result.But despite this impressive growth, .eu slipped from the tenth to the eleventh largest TLD with 3.67m domain names at the end of the third quarter. The registry notes that this has been caused by changes in the top level domain environment. An example given is .TK, the ccTLD for Tokelau, which gives away domain names for free and now has over 13 million registrations.At the end of the third quarter there were 3.67 million .eu domain names, compared to .com, the world’s largest TLD with 105.79 million registered domain names and .de (Germany) the world’s largest ccTLD, and second largest TLD, with 15.27 million registered domain names.Next is .net with 14.88 million registrations, .tk (Tokelau – approximately 13 million), .uk (United Kingdom – 10.24m), .org (10.10m), .info (7.24m), .nl (5.12m), .ru (Russia – 4.16m), .cn (China – 3.98m) and then .eu, now with 3.70m.”.eu registrations have risen steadily during 2012, with the Q3 results supporting our sustainable growth targets,” said EURid’s General Manager, Marc Van Wesemael. “During tough economic times, doing business online becomes ever more attractive. I see .eu’s growth as evidence of this trend across Europe.”EURid’s Q3 2012 report shows that Malta had the highest annual growth, a 35 percent rise in .eu registrations compared with Q3 2011, followed by Slovakia (22%) and Austria (21%). During the same period, registrations grew by over 15 percent annually in a further four European Union countries: the Czech Republic, Greece, Lithuania and Slovenia..eu completed the third quarter of 2012 with 3.67 million registered domain names. Across the EU, there were 8% more new .eu registrations in Q3 than during the same quarter in 2011. During these three months, Greece, Malta, Slovakia and Spain all increased by 5% or more.The full Q3 2012 report is available for download at link.eurid.eu/reports.TLD registration statistics come from Registrar Stats while ccTLD statistics come from registry websites.

PIR Survey Reveals That Most Americans Are Uninformed About DDoS Attacks

PIR .ORG logo[news release] Whether motivated by an extreme form of free expression or criminal intent, distributed denial-of-service attacks (DDoS attacks) are increasingly commonplace worldwide. Yet there remains a universal misunderstanding amongst the general public of what to do in the event of a DDoS attack.  According to a survey commissioned by Public Interest Registry (PIR) – the not-for-profit operator of the .ORG domain – to better assess Americans’ basic understanding of Internet and network attacks, 85 percent of Americans are uninformed or ill-equipped to deal with a DDoS attack. Moreover, only 17 percent could correctly identify what the acronym DDoS stood for with 77 percent admitting that they had no idea.

Through this survey, it was ultimately revealed that across the board there is a lack of understanding about DDoS attacks despite their increasing frequency. When asked whom should be the first point of call when one experiences a DDoS attack, respondents’ answers varied –a select number correctly identified a DNS Service Provider while the large majority of people said their first point of call would be their local electronic department store, a technology publication, their spouse or children, Google or the police, to name a few.

Additional findings from the survey revealed:

  • Overall, the higher the household income, the more knowledgeable Americans were on the subject. Regional differences (e.g. East Coast vs. Midwest) were marginal.
  • Surprisingly, education levels are not a factor. Respondents with college degrees were no more likely than those who did not complete their degree to correctly identify DDoS or know what to do if an attack ever happened to them.
  • On a whole, men are more informed on the subject than women with 24 percent correctly identifying DDoS as a type of network attack in comparison to their female counterparts’ 10 percent. Additionally, 20 percent of men compared to 11 percent of women would know what to do in the event of a DDoS attack.
  • In the event of a DDoS attack, only 36 percent of Americans would know where to turn to for advice. Of that number, nearly half of Americans 65-years-old and up would know where to seek help compared to only 28 percent of 18-24 year-olds.

“At PIR, we pride ourselves on being a name that people trust, and we’re committed to helping strengthen the safety and security of the Internet by providing the information people need to protect themselves from these attacks,” said Brian Cute, CEO of Public Interest Registry. “These findings only show that there is real misunderstanding about DDoS across all ages and levels of expertise, so we must do our part to engage with other Internet service providers and registry operators worldwide to discuss how we can be better prepared and prevent future attacks.  It’s in all of our interests – public and individual – to ensure that the Internet remains a safe and protected place for all users.”

In an effort to fuel the discussion about online attacks amongst, organizations and individuals, Public Interest Registry and NY Tech will be hosting “Mitigating DDoS Attacks: Best Practices for an Evolving Threat Landscape” – a forum on December 5 to help generate a thoughtful conversation on how Internet users can protect ourselves from DDoS attacks. Participants in the forum are experts from Google, Symantec, Afilias, Neustar, EFF, MAAWG, and De Natris Consult. For more information about the event (including registration and remote participation details) and the survey, please visit pir.org/why/security/ddos.

This PIR news release was sourced from:
pir.org/pr/2012/ddos