Tag Archives: Internet Assigned Numbers Authority

House Committees Taking Aim at IANA Transition Proposal by Philip Corwin, Internet Commerce Association

Internet Commerce Association logoIn an unanticipated move a third Committee of the US House of Representatives has weighed in with concerns regarding the NTIA’s proposed transition of the US role as counterparty to ICANN’s IANA functions contract to one with the “global multistakeholder community”.

On May 13th the House Armed Services Committee Report for HR 4435, the Defense Authorization bill, was released. It contains language referring to the ICANN transition and, in particular, the .Mil top level domain which is administered by the US Department of Defense Network Information Center (NIC, which also runs the g-root authoritative root server — while the h-root server is operated by the US Army Research Lab). The Report language (reproduced at the end of this post) questions whether .Mil, which has always been available solely for US military operations, will remain protected post-transition – and also states that “any negotiations that occur should include verifiable measures for maintaining a separation between the policymaking and technical operation of root-zone management functions and that such protections should be a red line in interagency discussions and U.S. Government positions.” (Emphasis added) The introduction of US national security concerns brings a new element into discussions of the IANA transition.

This latest action follows on the heels of IANA-related steps recently taken by two other House Committees:

  • The Commerce Committee passed the DOTCOM Act (HR 4342), which would delay any final decision on transfer of IANA oversight for up to one year while the GAO studied the matter.
  • Even more significantly, exercising the Congressional “power of the purse”, the Appropriations Committee slashed NTIA’s budget for the coming fiscal year by $14.3 million, from $51 to $36.7 million, with the specific intent of denying NTIA any funds to carry out the IANA transition in FY15.

The House will likely take up The Commerce, Justice, Science and Related Agencies Appropriations Act for FY2015, which contains that cut in NTIA funding, next week. Further, we have just learned that Rep. John Shimkus, lead sponsor of the DOTCOM Act, has filed the text of that legislation as an amendment to be offered to the Defense Authorization bill that is currently being considered on the House floor, and we expect both it and the underlying bill to pass the House.

All of these prior actions were taken on party-line votes in the Republican-controlled and highly polarized House, and next week’s House floor vote will likely follow that pattern. While such Senate Democrats as Robert Menendez and Mark Warner have expressed concerns about the IANA transition, we’d wager that if these proposals are passed by the House and sent over to the Senate they will never receive a vote so long as Harry Reid is the Democrat’s Majority Leader. Senate Democrats will also likely resist accepting the House provisions if a conference committee is appointed to seek resolution of the different positions on the appropriations bill.

However, given that the earliest goal for completing the IANA transition is September 2015, when the current contract term expires (although the US has the option of extending it for two more 2-year terms) the situation could change dramatically if Republicans succeed in gaining control of the Senate in the November 2014 elections. Most pollsters and election analysts give them a slightly better than even chance of doing so, given President Obama’s current low approval ratings as well as the historic trends for mid-term Congressional elections in a President’s second term. Yesterday’s primary results, in which Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell and other “establishment” GOP candidates defeated “tea party” challengers probably enhance that possibility of Republican Senate control in 2015-16.

ICANN’s initial proposal for both the process and scope of IANA transition discussions has already encountered broad and vocal opposition. Its new proposal for a parallel process to determine enhanced accountability mechanisms may prove equally controversial (we’ll be writing more on that shortly). While it remains to be seen how ICANN will respond to criticism of its proposed pathway, the NTIA has made clear that it expects it to convene an unbiased community discussion that results in a transition plan and accompanying accountability provisions that are credible and have broad consensus support. That deliberative process will take some considerable time, and in the interim the US political context could undergo significant alterations.

Here’s the Armed Services Committee Report language—

INTERNET GOVERNANCE

The committee is aware of a recent proposal by the Department of Commerce to start the process of transferring the remaining Department of Commerce-managed Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) functions to the global multi-stakeholder community. The committee is also aware that such a transition is supported by the Administration, many in industry, and the international community.

The committee urges caution in such discussions to understand the full ramifications of any transition of responsibility, since the United States has played an important role in overseeing the stability of the Internet. As noted in recent testimony before the Committee on the Judiciary of the House of Representatives, “Any pledge, commitment, or oath made by the current ICANN [Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers] leadership is not binding unless there is some accountability mechanism in place to back up that promise. Until now, the United States has served that role. If the U.S. Government is no longer providing that stability, an alternative mechanism is needed to ensure that ICANN is held accountable to the public interest.” Additionally, as this testimony points out, “U.S. oversight has served as a deterrent to stakeholders, including certain foreign countries, who might otherwise choose to interfere with ICANN’s operations or manipulate the Domain Name Servers for political purposes. For example, a country may want to censor a top-level domain name or have ICANN impose certain restrictions on domain name registries or registrars.”

Because of the Department of Defense’s equities in a secure and transparent Internet governance system, the committee believes it is important to ensure that any new Internet governance construct includes protections for the legacy .mil domains and maintains the associated Internet protocol numbers. Furthermore, the committee believes that any negotiations that occur should include verifiable measures for maintaining a separation between the policymaking and technical operation of root-zone management functions and that such protections should be a red line in interagency discussions and U.S. Government positions.

This article by Philip Corwin from the Internet Commerce Association was sourced with permission from the ICA blog at:
www.internetcommerce.org/House_Targets_IANA_Transition

ICANN: Call for Public Input: Draft Proposal, Based on Initial Community Feedback, of the Principles and Mechanisms and the Process to Develop a Proposal to Transition NTIA’s Stewardship of the IANA Functions

ICANN logoCall for Public Input:Posted 8 April, 2014 “Call for Public Input: Draft Proposal, Based on Initial Community Feedback, of the Principles and Mechanisms and the Process to Develop a Proposal to Transition NTIA‘s Stewardship of the IANA Functions.”

To ensure that the eventual proposal is community-driven and enjoys broad support, ICANN is committed to collecting and incorporating input and feedback from the global stakeholder community. Input and feedback can be sent at any time by posting on the ianatransition@icann.org mailing list (archives).

Opportunity for public dialogue and community feedback

Posted 8 April, 2014
Deadline 8 May, 2014 (midnight UTC)
Feedback should be submitted via the publicly archived mailing list ianatransition@icann.org

Introduction

On March 14, 2014 the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) announced its intent to transition key Internet domain name functions to the global multistakeholder community. NTIA asked ICANN, as the IANA functions contractor and the global coordinator for the DNS, to convene a multistakeholder process to develop a proposal for the transition. While looking to stakeholders and those most directly served by the IANA functions to work through the technical details, NTIA established a clear framework to guide the discussion and communicated to ICANN that the transition proposal must have broad community support and address the following four principles:

  • Support and enhance the multistakeholder model;
  • Maintain the security, stability, and resiliency of the Internet DNS;
  • Meet the needs and expectation of the global customers and partners of the IANA services; and,
  • Maintain the openness of the Internet.

In addition, NTIA explicitly stated that it would not accept a proposal that replaces the NTIA role with a government-led or an inter-governmental organization solution.

Read the entire announcement.

To ensure a clear understanding of the specific issues for which a proposal is sought, a document describing the scope of the document (and what is not in scope): http://www.icann.org/en/about/agreements/iana/iana-transition-scoping-08apr14-en.pdf

At the ICANN 49 Meeting in Singapore during the 24 March session, ICANN launched a multistakeholder-designed process to gather the community’s views and contributions to address how the mechanisms for the transition of NTIA‘s stewardship of the IANA functions should occur. In addition to a public session open to the 1,940 participants physically in Singapore as well as remote participation for the session, a mailing list (ianatransition@icann.org) was created to facilitate further input, with an initial comment deadline of March 27th.

Note: Comments received subsequent to 27 March are relevant to the dialogue and should be reviewed when reviewing the proposed draft process located here.

Based on that session and feedback received on the mailing list by 27 March, ICANN, filling the NTIA-requested role as convener of this process, now puts out for further feedback and input a draft proposal of the Principles, Mechanisms and Process to Develop a Proposal to Transition NTIA‘s Stewardship of the IANA functions.  This draft proposal was also informed by the existing mechanisms and models familiar to the ICANN community and proven to be successful in terms of results (i.e. the ATRT and AoC processes) and consultation with the Internet technical organizations.

Given that the various affected parties of IANA have somewhat different needs, there is value in keeping the distinct discussions running in parallel, and not forcing either full synchronization or exactly the same end result on them. This will ensure that the process completes sooner, and that the focus stays on the issues that are relevant to the particular parts of the IANA functions. Coordination however is needed. The discussions need to result in outcomes that are compatible, for particular issues (e.g. special use registries) we expect coordination essential for successful outcome.

The discussions in Singapore and subsequent input have confirmed the need for a parallel but separate process to examine broader ICANN globalization and accountability mechanisms as the proposal is developed for the transition of NTIA‘s stewardship of the IANA functions: this document does not attempt to address those mechanisms. The consultation process on ICANN globalization and accountability, while highly interrelated with the transition from the USG, shall occur within the ICANN community. Building on discussions held in Singapore at the public session, this process is beginning (in parallel with the transition process) in a bottom-up manner.

Community-Suggested Principles & Mechanisms for the Process

At the 24 March session on IANA Stewardship Transition at ICANN 49 in Singapore (24 March 2014), ICANN held a discussion to define the transition process, seeking public and community input. Present and remote attendees, as well as the general public later, were asked to provide input on the following questions:

  • What are the most important principles for this process?
  • What mechanisms are important to ensure a well-run process?

Based on feedback in the session (audio and transcript), the Public Forum session on 27 March 2014 (audio and transcript), and through the mailing list ianatransition@icann.org (email archives) received by the 27 March 2014 (midnight UTC) deadline, the following principles and mechanisms were suggested.

Principles

  • Inclusive
  • Transparent
  • Global
  • Accountable
  • Multistakeholder
  • Focused [in scope]
  • Pragmatic and evidence-based
  • Open [to all voices]
  • Do no harm
  • Consensus-based

Mechanisms

  • Web-based platform
  • Utilize working group methods
  • Organize dialogues
  • Leverage existing information and processes
  • Conduct stress tests
  • Establish clear and visible timeline
  • Recognize discussion in other fora
  • Widely accessible engagement platforms
  • Multilingual support
  • Multiple comment fora

Community Suggested Proposal Development Process

At the IANA Stewardship Transition session at ICANN 49 in Singapore (24 March 2014), participants were also asked to provide input on the proposed process to use in the development of a proposal to transition the stewardship of the IANA functions to the global multistakeholder community. Discussion also occurred at the Public Forum session on 27 March 2014 (audio and transcript), and through the mailing list ianatransition@icann.org (email archives).

Feedback from the community pointed to the value of establishing a working or steering group of volunteers to steward the process. Other proposed mechanisms to ensure transparency and accountability include employing use cases for testing the proposed models, and establishing clear and visible phases of activity. Other suggestions note that the process ought to conclude with the emergence of a community-driven proposal.

Based on feedback described above and informed by successful community-developed processes and mechanisms, including the review processes set out in the Affirmation of Commitments (AoC), the following outline for the proposal development process is offered for comment.

Form and operate a steering group to steward the process in an open, transparent, inclusive and accountable manner as described below.

  • The community would form a steering group to shepherd the process. The steering group would be comprised of two representatives from each SO/AC group within the ICANN community, and two representatives from each of the affected parties (IETF, IAB, ISOC, NRO).
  • Within the ICANN community, community members interested in serving need to submit a statement of interest. The Chair of the ICANN Board and Chair of the GAC will select the group members from this community similar to the approach used for AoC reviews. The affected parties will select their own representatives to the steering group.
  • Care is taken by this selection process to ensure diversity and regional representation and to guard against any ICANN conflict of interest.
  • The steering group would designate the steering group chair.
  • The role of the steering group is to coordinate and to ensure that the process proceeds appropriately. The relevant affected parties will lead their community processes to determine any necessary mechanism as appropriate. However, the steering group has to coordinate such results so that they fit the overall proposed mechanism.
  • As the convener of the process, the ICANN Board would appoint one participant as Board liaison to the steering group.
  • The ICANN Board in overseeing ICANN‘s role as convener would: 1) ensure that the process executed adheres to the principles outlined by the community input and the NTIA principles outlined for this effort, and 2) ensure that the parameters of the scope document are upheld. Once a proposal is developed, the ICANN Board will not hold a vote on the proposal.
  • The steering group’s final proposal for submission to NTIA will be reviewed by ICANN and the affected parties in order for each party to provide their endorsement of the proposal. That endorsement will be communicated with the proposal, but there will not be a formal voting process.
  • The steering group would be supported by an ICANN secretariat.
  • Additional mechanisms to ensure an open, transparent and inclusive process would include:
    • A website that would include a timeline of activities and events, as well as all materials and communications from the steering group, and a full archive of all content provided and evaluated throughout the process;
    • A mailing list to ensure anyone can remain involved in the activities and progress of the group; and,
    • All meetings and phone conference will be open for stakeholders to observe and relevant transcripts and recordings will be posted.
  • The steering group would be formed in time to convene for the first time as a group during ICANN 50 in London in June 2014.
  • The steering group would hold an open forum meeting at London 50 to present itself to the community and hear additional input from the community. The steering group would have ongoing dialogues.
  • This group would, in the London 50 timeframe, establish the steering group chair and finalize the group’s charter, based on the inputs from the community, the scoping document and the principles set forth by NTIA. The steering group would also establish the process for development of the community-driven proposal.
  • The specific process, which would be determined by the steering group, should include the following elements, similar to previous effective working group efforts among the community:
    • Adequate time should be afforded for proposal development processes conducted by affected parties and other interested parties, in order to appropriately provide the steering group all possible proposal elements on which it can deliberate.
    • There should be appropriate community outreach and input as the proposal is drafted.
    • The efforts to finalize the ultimate proposal to be delivered to ICANN for presentation to NTIA should be consensus-driven.

Proposed Steering Group and Process graphics can be found below:

Steering Group

IANA Steering Group Formation

Process

IANA Steering Group Process

Questions Relating to this Initial Draft:

Q1. Are these the correct principles to guide the process to develop a proposal to transition the stewardship of the IANA functions to the global multistakeholder community? If not, why not and what additional principles should be considered?

Q2. Are these the correct mechanisms to use in the process to develop a proposal to transition the stewardship of the IANA functions to the global multistakeholder community? If not, why not and what additional mechanisms should be considered?

Q3. Are there other factors ICANN as the convener of process should take into account relevant to principles and mechanisms to be used to develop a proposal to transition the stewardship of the IANA functions to the global multistakeholder community? If so, please describe

Q4. Is this the creation of a steering group to steward the process to develop a proposal to transition the stewardship of the IANA functions to the global multistakeholder community the right approach? If not, why not and what other approach should be used in its place?

Q5. Are the steps outlined above to create and operate a steering group to steward the process to develop a proposal to transition the stewardship of the IANA functions to the global multistakeholder community the right approach? If not, why not and what steps are missing?

Q6. Are there other factors ICANN as the convener of process should take into account relevant to the creation of a steering group to steward the process to develop a proposal to transition the stewardship of the IANA functions to the global multistakeholder community the right approach? If so, please describe.

How to Participate in the Process

Participation is open to anyone who wishes to engage in this process. There are many existing fora among the affected parties, and beyond, that are engaging in dialogues at their regional events. A list of events can be viewed below:

Timeline of events

Affected Party's Dialogue Fora Timeline

If you have suggestions for a participation opportunity not listed here, please send them to ianatransition@icann.org.

ICANN will also continue to hold public discussions, including at its upcoming ICANN Meetings in London (June 2014), Los Angeles (October 2014), and to be determined dates and locations in Africa, Latin America, and Europe in 2015.

Engagement and outreach will also take place globally and in partnership among respective organizations.

Visit ICANN.org for more information and resources; join our online public forums; send your thoughts to ianatransition@icann.org or read the archives; register for one of the many upcoming webinars; or follow us on our social channels (#IANAtransition)—be a part of the discussion!

About the IANA Team

The Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) team is responsible for the operational aspects of coordinating the Internet’s unique identifiers (the Domain Name System (DNS) Root, IP addressing, and other Internet protocol resources) and maintaining the trust of the community to provide these services in an unbiased, responsible and effective manner.

To learn more about the IANA functions visit www.IANA.org

Read Elise Gerich’s (VP, IANA and Technical Operations) transcript (PDF, pages 8-9) introducing the IANA functions in the IANA Accountability Transition session ICANN 49 in Singapore (March 2014).

Consultation Over IANA Stewardship To Be Accessible To All

The process of determining how best to transfer stewardship of key internet technical functions from the US Government to the international community began Monday during ICANN’s 49th public meeting in Singapore and be accessible to as many as possible. ICANN President and CEO Fadi Chehadé said information will be available in all six United Nations languages plus Portuguese as well as for people with accessibility issues.This was important, Chehadé said, so as many people as possible from as many parts of the world could participate in the consultation process.Discussions on the transfer of stewardship were driven by the recent announcement from the United States Government.”Everyone is welcome and ICANN is committed to equal participation by all parties interested to give their opinion,” Chehadé said. “We must all be equal partners.” The consultation will be “inclusive and allow full participation.”But the consultation process has not yet been clearly defined with concerns being raised about the clarity of how it will take place. Explaining this, Chehadé noted, a memo will be coming out on 7 April to explain more.”This is indeed momentous,” Chehadé told an international news conference. “The decision by the United States Government validates the idea that people around the world can come together and manage a global resource that is borderless.”But when asked what the timeline was, Chehadé was non-committal, saying that the security, stability and resiliency of the internet were more important. Further, Chehadé reiterated the NTIA’s recent comments that said no transfer would take place unless the IS Government were satisfied there would be no detrimental impacts on the internet. However Chehadé said that September 2015, the end date for the current IANA contract is what the organisation is working towards. But if it is not ready to happen, ICANN will ask for an extension of their contract.Explaining the next steps in the transition process, Chehadé went on to say, “We will now take the global process launched today by the ICANN community to the world. We will have meetings and consultations with the public, communities and with our fellow technical organisations, the IETF, the Regional Internet Registries, and here most importantly in the Asia Pacific region, APNIC, who will be partnering with us in getting the word out to involve everyone into that process.””I would like to congratulate ICANN for successfully setting up two regional hubs last year, one in Istanbul, Turkey, and the other here in Singapore,” said Dr. Yaacob Ibrahim, Singapore’s Minister for Communications and Information. “It underscores ICANN’s commitment to serve the global community. and I believe that Asia-Pacific hub in Singapore will be a great vehicle for ICANN to reach out to the region.”Absolutely central to everything that we do and that matters to the world at large is the security, stability and resiliency of the system,” said Board Chair Dr. Stephen D. Crocker. “The discussion that is taking place now has to do with the stewardship, but with the proviso of continued stability and rock-solid operations of the core functions.”

Internet Technical Leaders Welcome IANA Globalisation Progress

The leaders of the Internet technical organisations responsible for coordination of the Internet infrastructure (IETF, IAB, RIRs, ccTLD ROs, ICANN, ISOC, and W3C), welcome the US Government’s announcement of the suggested changes related to the IANA functions contract.The roles on policy development processes of the Internet technical organisations and ICANN’s role as administrator of the IANA functions, remain unchanged.The transition of the US Government stewardship has been envisaged since the early days of IANA functions contract. This transition is now feasible due to the maturity of the Internet technical organisations involved in performing their respective roles related to the IANA functions, and ICANN will facilitate a global, multi-stakeholder process to plan for the transition.The strength and stability of the IANA functions within the above organisations (which make up the Internet technical community) are critical to the operation of the Internet. The processes around the IANA functions have always been carefully specified in the communities that our organisations represent. The IANA functions are faithfully administered by ICANN. We are committed to continuing our proven, community-driven processes as we engage in this transition. Our communities are already considering proposals to progress the transition.Our organisations are committed to open and transparent multi-stakeholder processes. We are also committed to further strengthening our processes and agreements related to the IANA functions, and to building on the existing organisations and their roles. The Internet technical community is strong enough to continue its role, while assuming the stewardship function as it transitions from the US Government.

Participating Leaders

  • Adiel A. Akplogan, CEO African Network Information Center (AFRINIC)
  • Barrack Otieno, Manager, The African Top Level Domains Organization (AFTLD)
  • Paul Wilson, Director General Asia-Pacific Network Information Centre (APNIC)
  • Don Hollander, General Manager Asia Pacific Top Level Domain Association (APTLD)
  • John Curran, CEO American Registry for Internet Numbers (ARIN)
  • Peter Van Roste, General Manager, Council for European National Top Level Domain Registries (CENTR)
  • Russ Housley, Chair Internet Architecture Board (IAB)
  • Fadi Chehadé, President and CEO Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN)
  • Jari Arkko, Chair Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF)
  • Kathy Brown, President and CEO Internet Society (ISOC)
  • Raúl Echeberría, CEO Latin America and Caribbean Internet Addresses Registry (LACNIC)
  • Carolina Aguerre, General Manager, Latin American and Caribbean TLD Association (LACTLD)
  • Axel Pawlik, Managing Director Réseaux IP Européens Network Coordination Centre (RIPE NCC)
  • Jeff Jaffe, CEO World Wide Web Consortium (W3C)

NTIA Announces Intent to Transition Key Internet Domain Name Functions

[news release] To support and enhance the multistakeholder model of Internet policymaking and governance, the U.S. Commerce Department’s National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) today announces its intent to transition key Internet domain name functions to the global multistakeholder community. As the first step, NTIA is asking the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) to convene global stakeholders to develop a proposal to transition the current role played by NTIA in the coordination of the Internet’s domain name system (DNS).NTIA’s responsibility includes the procedural role of administering changes to the authoritative root zone file – the database containing the lists of names and addresses of all top-level domains – as well as serving as the historic steward of the DNS. NTIA currently contracts with ICANN to carry out the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) functions and has a Cooperative Agreement with Verisign under which it performs related root zone management functions. Transitioning NTIA out of its role marks the final phase of the privatization of the DNS as outlined by the U.S. Government in 1997.”The timing is right to start the transition process,” said Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Communications and Information Lawrence E. Strickling. “We look forward to ICANN convening stakeholders across the global Internet community to craft an appropriate transition plan.”ICANN is uniquely positioned, as both the current IANA functions contractor and the global coordinator for the DNS, as the appropriate party to convene the multistakeholder process to develop the transition plan. NTIA has informed ICANN that it expects that in the development of the proposal, ICANN will work collaboratively with the directly affected parties, including the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), the Internet Architecture Board (IAB), the Internet Society (ISOC), the Regional Internet Registries (RIRs), top level domain name operators, VeriSign, and other interested global stakeholders.NTIA has communicated to ICANN that the transition proposal must have broad community support and address the following four principles:

  • Support and enhance the multistakeholder model;
  • Maintain the security, stability, and resiliency of the Internet DNS;
  • Meet the needs and expectation of the global customers and partners of the IANA services; and,
  • Maintain the openness of the Internet.

Consistent with the clear policy expressed in bipartisan resolutions of the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives (S.Con.Res.50 and H.Con.Res.127), which affirmed the United States support for the multistakeholder model of Internet governance, NTIA will not accept a proposal that replaces the NTIA role with a government-led or an inter-governmental organization solution.From the inception of ICANN, the U.S. Government and Internet stakeholders envisioned that the U.S. role in the IANA functions would be temporary. The Commerce Department’s June 10, 1998 Statement of Policy [pdf] stated that the U.S. Government “is committed to a transition that will allow the private sector to take leadership for DNS management.” ICANN as an organisation has matured and taken steps in recent years to improve its accountability and transparency and its technical competence. At the same time, international support continues to grow for the multistakeholder model of Internet governance as evidenced by the continued success of the Internet Governance Forum and the resilient stewardship of the various Internet institutions.While stakeholders work through the ICANN-convened process to develop a transition proposal, NTIA’s current role will remain unchanged. The current IANA functions contract expires September 30, 2015.For further information see: IANA Functions and Related Root Zone Management Transition Questions and AnswersAbout NTIANTIA is the Executive Branch agency that advises the President on telecommunications and information policy issues. NTIA’s programs and policymaking focus largely on expanding broadband Internet access and adoption in America, expanding the use of spectrum by all users, and ensuring that the Internet remains an engine for continued innovation and economic growth. To find out more about NTIA, visit www.ntia.doc.gov.This NTIA news release was sourced from:
www.ntia.doc.gov/press-release/2014/ntia-announces-intent-transition-key-internet-domain-name-functions

IGP Proposes Roadmap For Globalising IANA

The Internet Governance Project has released what they describe as “an innovative proposal to resolve the 15-year controversy over the United States government’s special relationship to … ICANN.”The proposal, which has been published on the IGP blog, “involves removing root zone management functions from ICANN and creating an independent and neutral private sector consortium to take them over, will be presented at the Singapore ICANN meeting March 21, and then formally submitted to the ‘NETMundial’ Global Multistakeholder Meeting on the Future of Internet Governance in São Paulo, Brazil, April 23 and 24.””We think this plan provides the roadmap for making ICANN into a truly global and multistakeholder institution,” said Dr. Milton Mueller, co-author with Dr. Brenden Kuerbis.The contracts ICANN and Verisign have with the US Government “are an understandable legacy of the Internet’s origins in Defense Department and National Science Foundation, the U.S. has maintained control of ICANN long after it promised to let go. This has invited other governments, including authoritarian ones, to demand equal oversight authority over the DNS.””Unless we take a consistent and principled approach to non-governmental Internet governance,” Dr. Mueller claimed, “it is only a matter of time before other governments succeed in bringing the coordination and management of the Internet under the control of intergovernmental treaty organisations.”The IGP proposal is an attempt to develop a blueprint for globalisation of the IANA functions. In summary, the plan outlined on the IGP blog would:

  • “structurally separate the IANA functions from ICANN’s policy process, and ensure that the IANA functions are never used for political or regulatory purposes
  • integrate the DNS-related IANA functions with the Root Zone Maintainer functions performed by Verisign, and put them into a new, independent “DNS Authority” (DNSA)
  • create a nonprofit controlled by a consortium of TLD registries and root server operators to run the DNSA.
  • complete the transition by September 2015, when the current IANA contract expires.”

“It’s important/essential not to conflate policy with the operation of the root zone,” Kuerbis said in the IGP post. “It makes sense to put operational authority in the hands of an entity comprised of the registries and root server operators, as they are directly impacted by operation of the root, and have strong incentives to ensure its stability and security.””Contractually binding the DNSA to ICANN ensures adherence to the policy development process, and provides an important accountability function,” Kuerbis added. “It’s an institutional design that is consistent with the multistakeholder model and achievable in the near term.”The proposal was submitted to the NETMundial (Brazil) meeting on 2 March and can be download and commented on through links from the original IGP post at www.internetgovernance.org/2014/03/03/a-roadmap-for-globalizing-iana.

Statement from the I* Leaders Coordination Meeting, Santa Monica, 14 February 2014

ICANN logoLeaders of the organizations responsible for coordination of the Internet technical infrastructure (loosely referred to as “I* leaders”) met last week in Santa Monica, California, USA. During the 2-day meeting, they discussed activities underway and exchanged views and updates on a range of topics including:

There was discussion of the significant progress and momentum that has developed since our last meeting, and as well as the need for continued engagement of all stakeholders in evolution of the Internet ecosystem. The leaders were encouraged by the progress made in many areas, and note that there is a lot of work happening in our respective communities, driven by the participants and handled with the usual community processes.

The meeting also welcomed Kathy Brown, the incoming CEO of the Internet Society, and Carolina Aguerre as a representative of the ccTLD registry community.

Participating I* Leaders –

  • Adiel A. Akplogan, CEO African Network Information Center (AFRINIC)
  • John Curran, CEO American Registry for Internet Numbers (ARIN)
  • Paul Wilson, Director General Asia-Pacific Network Information Centre (APNIC)
  • Russ Housley, Chair Internet Architecture Board (IAB)
  • Fadi Chehadé, President and CEO Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN)
  • Jari Arkko, Chair Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF)
  • Kathy Brown, President and CEO Internet Society (ISOC)
  • Raúl Echeberría, CEO Latin America and Caribbean Internet Addresses Registry (LACNIC)
  • Axel Pawlik, Managing Director Réseaux IP Européens Network Coordination Centre (RIPE NCC)
  • Jeff Jaffe, CEO World Wide Web Consortium (W3C)
  • Carolina Aguerre, General Manager, LACTLD (association of ccTLD registry operators in Latin America and Caribbean)

This ICANN announcement was sourced from:
www.icann.org/en/news/announcements/announcement-14feb14-en.htm

ICANN: IANA Functions Satisfaction Survey Yields Overwhelmingly Positive Results

ICANN logoICANN is reporting extremely high levels of customer satisfaction according to the results of the 2013 Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) Functions Customer Satisfaction Survey.

 

Read the report » [PDF, 1.19 MB]

“We are pleased with the high level of satisfaction reported by our customers,” said Elise Gerich. ICANN‘s Vice President of IANA and Technical Operations. “We continue to explore ways to improve the service of administering the protocol parameter registries, the allocation of Internet numbers, and changes to the root zone.”

The survey, conducted by Ebiquity, investigated seven critical areas of the IANA functions, including:

  • Documentation quality (100% satisfaction)
  • Process quality (100% satisfaction)
  • Accuracy (99% satisfaction)
  • Courtesy (99% satisfaction)
  • Transparency (95% satisfaction)

Unlike the previous year’s survey, the 2013 survey targeted specific customer groups to better understand how each group perceives ICANN‘s handling of the IANA functions. Of the eight groups surveyed, 5 reported over 90% satisfaction.

“It’s good to see that the people who request protocol assignments or routine root management changes and use our registries report such high levels of satisfaction,” said Michelle Cotton, Manager of IANA Services. “We will be following up with small groups over the next few months to discuss how to further improve customer satisfaction.”

With the results of the 2013 survey finalized, ICANN will investigate ways to increase participation in next year’s survey.

“In 2013 we gathered input from each customer group, while maintaining anonymity, improving on the more general survey conducted in 2012,” said Leo Vegoda, Operational Excellence Manager, “In 2014 we plan to improve participation in the survey.”

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To learn more about IANA, go to www.iana.org/

Ebiquity is a global media, marketing and reputation consultancy, with over 20 years of experience in customer and stakeholder research. For more information, go to www.ebiquity.com/en.

This ICANN announcement was sourced from:
www.icann.org/en/news/announcements/announcement-15jan14-en.htm

ICANN: Consultation on ccTLD Delegation and Redelegation User Instructions and Source of Policy and Procedures

ICANN logoBrief Overview
Purpose (Brief): A consultation on User Instructions and Source of Policy for Delegation and Redelegation of a Country-Code Top Level Domain (ccTLD).

Current Status:Initial public consultation
Next Steps: Review comments received
Detailed Information
Section I: Description, Explanation, and Purpose:

The Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) functions contract (SA1301-12-CN-0035) between ICANN and the United States Department of Commerce, National Telecommunications Information Administration (NTIA) to maintain the continuity and stability of services related to certain interdependent Internet technical management functions, known collectively as the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority calls for a public consultation from all interested and affected parties to help satisfy the following objective:

C.2.6 Transparency and Accountability — [No later than 1 October 2013], the Contractor shall develop performance standards, in collaboration with all interested and affected parties as enumerated in Section C.1.3, develop user instructions including technical requirements for each corresponding IANA function and post via a website.

C.2.7 Responsibility and Respect for Stakeholders – [No later than 1 October 2013], the contractor shall, in collaboration with all interested and affected parties as enumerated in Section C.1.C, develop for each of the IANA functions a process for documenting the source of the policies and procedures and how it will apply the relevant policies and procedures for the corresponding IANA function and post via a website.

This consultation involves the operation of the Delegations and Redelegations of Country Code Top Level Domains (ccTLDs) described in the IANA functions contract as the following:

C.2.9.2.c Delegation and Redelegation of a Country Code Top Level Domain (ccTLD) ‑ The Contractor shall apply existing policy frameworks in processing requests related to the delegation and redelegation of a ccTLD, such as RFC 1591 Domain Name System Structure and Delegation, the Governmental Advisory Committee (GAC) Principles And Guidelines For The Delegation AND Administration Of Country Code Top Level Domains, and any further clarification of these policies by interested and affected parties as enumerated in Section C.1.3. If a policy framework does not exist to cover a specific instance, the Contractor will consult with the interested and affected parties, as enumerated in Section C.1.3; relevant public authorities and governments on any recommendation that is not within or consistent with an existing policy framework. In making its recommendations, the Contractor shall also take into account the relevant national frameworks and applicable laws of the jurisdiction that the TLD registry serves. The Contractor shall submit its recommendations to the COR via a Delegation and Redelegation Report.

Section II: Background:
This is one of a series of consultations to establish user instructions and source of policy for the delivery of the IANA functions, as described in contract SA1301-12-CN-0035.
Important Information Links
Comment / Reply Periods (*)
Comment Open Date: 9 September 2013
Comment Close Date: 30 September 2013 – 23:59 UTC
Reply Open Date: 1 October 2013
Reply Close Date: 21 October 2013 – 23:59 UTC

This ICANN announcement was sourced from:
www.icann.org/en/news/public-comment/cctld-drd-ui-policy-09sep13-en.htm