Tag Archives: GoDaddy

GoDaddy and then Google Reject Neo-Nazi’s Domain Registration

First GoDaddy and then 3 hours later Google rejected the domain name registration for the Daily Stormer, a neo-Nazi website, Monday. According to Whois, the domain name is still registered with Google.

“We are cancelling Daily Stormer’s registration with Google Domains for violating our terms of service,” a Google spokesman said told Bloomberg. The organisation’s YouTube channel was also deleted late Monday afternoon US time.

Citing their support of the “Unite the Right” march in Charlottesville, Virginia, last weekend GoDaddy quickly pulled the domain name.

GoDaddy tweeted they had given the website operators 24 hours to find a new host. “We informed The Daily Stormer that they have 24 hours to move the domain to another provider, as they have violated our terms of service,” the tweet says.

After the Daily Stormer transferred their domain name to Google, they decided the content on the site “didn’t meet its rules for web support and advertising, which prohibit content that incites violence. Google plans to implement the cancellation policy over the next two days, according to a person with knowledge of the decision.”

Now access to the website is available on the Dark Web according to a Reuters report. Supporters started tweeting this Tuesday.

But one organisation appears to be not disassociating themselves from the controversial site. Cloudflare, a content delivery network that helps protect sites from DDOS attacks has refused to cancel their dealings with the Daily Stormer, according to Business Insider.

In a statement provided to Business Insider, the company said it was “aware” that concerns had been raised about some of the sites it supports and that it considers the content on some of those sites to be “repugnant.” But it noted that it doesn’t actually host any websites.

“Cloudflare terminating any user would not remove their content from the Internet, it would simply make a site slower and more vulnerable to attack,” the company said in its statement.

Cloudflare isn’t trying to hide its association with the neo-Nazi websites. Visitors to the DailyStormer.com and AltRight.com momentarily see a page from Cloudflare saying that the company is “checking your browser” before being forwarded on to their sites.

Uniregistry Hikes New gTLD Prices Up To 3,000% And GoDaddy Drops The Lot

The recent announcement that Uniregistry would be upping the prices on 16 of its underperforming new gTLDs by up to 3,115% from 21 August has had one, so far, really unfortunate consequence. GoDaddy, the world’s largest registrar, announced it was dropping Uniregistry’s entire portfolio of gTLDs from its offerings.

“We need more revenue from these strings, especially the low volume ones, without question,” Uniregistry CEO Frank Schilling told Domain Incite, who broke the story, at the time. “We can’t push on a string and stoke demand overnight. So in order for that string to survive as a standalone it has to be profitable.”

While an increase in the registry fee need not impact on registrations, the case of .berlin increasing their registry fee by 50% is a case in point, it’s hard to see how increases closer to 3,000% will add to either revenue or registrations. In the case of .berlin, the registry fee increased from €20 to €30.

But GoDaddy’s decision isn’t final according to Domain Name Wire.

“We have stopped registering or transferring Uniregistry domain names into our system,” GoDaddy. GM of Domains Mike McLaughlin told Domain Name Wire. “The dramatic price hike Uniregistry announced left us no choice. Until we can assess the impact on our current and potential customers, we have stopped new registrations.”

Uniregistry thinks the decision won’t last. Schilling told Domain Incite he was “surprised” by the decision.

“We are extremely surprised by GoDaddy’s reaction but are pleased that our extensions are available at many other registrars who support our approach. We remain ready to support GoDaddy when they decide on a path which works for their customers. We expect them to return.”

Uniregistry is the eighth largest new gTLD registry by domains under management with over 851,000 registrations across 24 new generic top level domains, the largest of which is .link (372,700 DUM) and .click (158,400). It’s not just the gTLDs with the lowest registration figures as previously speculated that are impacted, both .link and .click are too.

See below for the list of impacted gTLDs and the increases, as compiled by Blacknight.

Domain Extension Current Retail Price Wholesale % Increase New Retail Price
.juegos €11.99 3115% €349.00
.hosting €24.99 1400% €349.00
.audio €11.99 972% €119.00
.diet €16.99 650% €119.00
.hiphop €16.99 650% €119.00
.flowers €21.99 466% €119.00
.guitars €24.99 400% €119.00
.property €24.99 400% €119.00
.blackfriday €32.99 275% €119.00
.sexy €16.99 200% €49.99
.christmas €24.99 150% €59.99
.click €6.99 50% €8.99
.help €16.99 50% €24.99
.pics €16.99 50% €24.99
.tattoo €24.99 50% €39.99
.link €8.99 5% €8.99

The above table was sourced from the Blacknight blog here.

ICANN: Release of Country and Territory Names within the .HYUNDAI, .KIA and .GODADDY TLDs

ICANN new generic Top Level Domains logoBrief Overview

Purpose: This public comment period aims at gathering community input on proposed amendments to the .HYUNDAI, .KIA and .GODADDY Registry Agreements to allow the registration of country and territory names currently reserved under Section 4 of Specification 5 of the Registry Agreement. These amendments are intended to implement the requests from the registry operators to offer a new registry service, which were submitted through the Registry Services Evaluation Policy (RSEP) process.

Open Date:27 Apr 2016 23:59 UTC

Close Date:9 Jun 2016 23:59 UTC

Staff Report Due:23 Jun 2016 23:59 UTC

Current Status: As required by the Registry Services Evaluation Policy (RSEP), ICANN has undertaken a preliminary determination on whether the proposals might raise significant competition, security or stability issues. ICANN‘s preliminary review (based on the information provided) did not identify any such issues for these proposals.

To inform discussions of the next steps, ICANN is posting for public review and comment drafts of Registry Agreement amendments that would apply to the registry service, if approved.

As required per Section 4 of Specification 5 of the Registry Agreement, the release of country and territory names from reservation is subject to review by ICANN‘s Governmental Advisory Committee (GAC) and approval by ICANN. Alternatively, the Registry Operator may reach agreement with the applicable government(s) to release specific country and territory names.

In the GAC‘s Singapore Communiqué [PDF, 113 KB] (11 February 2015), the GAC advised ICANN Board to “work with the GAC to develop a public database to streamline the process for the release of country and territory names at the second level, as outlined in Specification 5. The database will inform whether individual GAC Members intend to agree to all requests, review them case by case, or not agree to any. The absence of input from a government will not be considered as agreement”.

Subsequent to the GAC‘s Singapore Communiqué (11 February 2015), on 23 April 2015, the GAC Chair sent a letter [PDF, 180 KB] to the Chairman of the ICANN Board, confirming its intent to work on a proposal for the development of such database for the process for release of country and territory names.

Also it is stated in the GAC‘s Buenos Aires Communiqué [PDF, 107 KB] (24 June 2015) that “the GAC is continuing to develop a database of country requirements for notification of requests for release of country/territory names at the second level in new gTLDs (reserved according to the application rules for new gTLDs), with options for governments to state that they do not object to release and abstain from notifications for such requests”. The list was finalised and published on the GAC website on 30 July 2015.

On 12 October 2015, ICANN published the Country and Territory Names webpage to provide information regarding names currently reserved under Specification 5 Section 4 of the New gTLD Registry Agreement. The webpage provides clarification regarding the Governmental Advisory Committee Notification Requirements list established to facilitate notification of registry requests for release of country and territory names as second-level domains in new gTLDs.

Next Steps: ICANN will prepare a Public Comment Summary and Analysis Report at the conclusion of the comment period. ICANN will consider these comments along with the advice from the GAC as it considers whether or not to approve the requested amendments.

Section I: Description, Explanation, and Purpose

Section 4 of Specification 5 of the Registry Agreement addresses the reservation and release of country and territory names. Registry Operators are required to reserve such names, and may propose either the release of specific country and territory names upon agreement with the relevant government(s), or the release of country and territory names subject to review by the Governmental Advisory Committee and approval by ICANN. Specifically, the Registry Agreement provides as follows:

The country and territory names (including their IDN variants, where applicable) contained in the following internationally recognized lists shall be withheld from registration or allocated to Registry Operator at All Levels:

4.1. the short form (in English) of all country and territory names contained on the ISO 3166-1 list, as updated from time to time, including the European Union, which is exceptionally reserved on the ISO 3166-1 list, and its scope extended in August 1999 to any application needing to represent the name European Union <http://www.iso.org/iso/support/country_codes/iso_3166_code_lists/iso-3166-1_decoding_table.htm>;

4.2. the United Nations Group of Experts on Geographical Names, Technical Reference Manual for the Standardization of Geographical Names, Part III Names of Countries of the World; and

4.3. the list of United Nations member states in 6 official United Nations languages prepared by the Working Group on Country Names of the United Nations Conference on the Standardization of Geographical Names;

provided, that the reservation of specific country and territory names (including their IDN variants according to the registry operator IDN registration policy, where applicable) may be released to the extent that Registry Operator reaches agreement with the applicable government(s). Registry Operator must not activate such names in the DNS; provided, that Registry Operator may propose the release of these reservations, subject to review by ICANN‘s Governmental Advisory Committee and approval by ICANN. Upon conclusion of Registry Operator’s designation as operator of the registry for the TLD, all such names that remain withheld from registration or allocated to Registry Operator shall be transferred as specified by ICANN. Registry Operator may self-allocate and renew such names without use of an ICANN accredited registrar, which will not be considered Transactions for purposes of Section 6.1 of the Agreement.

The New gTLD registry operators listed below submitted requests to ICANN through the Registry Services Evaluation Policy (RSEP) process to release country and territory names in the second level. In total, the requests concern three new gTLDs. The RSEP requests are proposed to be implemented by amending Exhibit A, Approved Services of the respective Registry Agreements, which are being posted for public comment.

Proposal TLD Registry Name Documents
2016016 godaddy Go Daddy East, LLC Go Daddy East, LLC Request 4 April 2016 [PDF, 17 KB]
2014142 kia KIA Motors Corporation KIA Motors Corporation Request 22 September 2015 [PDF, 19 KB]
2014141 hyundai Hyundai Motor Company Hyundai Motor Company Request 22 September 2015 [PDF, 19 KB]

As part of these requests, each registry operator described the country and territory domain names that it would offer for registration. These RSEP requests were posted for public information on the Registry Service Evaluation Process webpage, available at https://www.icann.org/resources/pages/rsep-2014-02-19-en.

As provided by the Registry Services Evaluation Policy, ICANN has undertaken a preliminary determination on whether these proposals might raise significant competition, security or stability issues. ICANN‘s preliminary review (based on the information provided) did not identify any such issues for these requests.

In addition, as required per Section 4 of Specification 5 of the Registry Agreement, the proposed release of the reserved country and territory names is subject to review by ICANN‘s Governmental Advisory Committee (GAC). Thus, these requests have been forwarded to the GAC for consideration and also the amendments to implement these requests are being posted for comment by the community.

Section II: Background

The proposed amendments to .HYUNDAI, .KIA and .GODADDY Registry Agreements to implement the registry services as described in the RSEP proposal are similar to the previously posted nine public comment announcements which included a total of thirty-eight RSEP requests involving forty-four new gTLDs:

On 19 September 2014, a similar public comment period for the RSEP proposal and amendment for the release of country and territory names within .NEUSTAR was opened. The public comment forum for this request can be found here: https://www.icann.org/public-comments/ctn-release-neustar-2014-09-19-en.

On 11 December 2014, a similar public comment period for the RSEP proposals and amendments for the release of country and territory names within .BMW and .MINI was opened. The public comment forum this request can be found here: https://www.icann.org/public-comments/bmw-mini-amendment-2014-12-11-en.

On 6 January 2015, a similar public comment period for the RSEP proposals and amendments for the release of country and territory names within .DVAG, .TUI, .SPIEGEL, .ALLFINANZ and .FLSMIDTH was opened. The public comment forum this request can be found here: https://www.icann.org/public-comments/ctn-release-tlds-2015-01-06-en.

On 2 March 2015, a similar public comment period for the RSEP proposals and amendments for the release of country and territory names within .EMERCK, .HAMBURG and .BERLIN was opened. The public comment forum this request can be found here: https://www.icann.org/public-comments/emerck-hamburg-berlin-amendment-2015-03-02-en.

On 31 March 2015, a similar public comment period for the RSEP proposals and amendments for the release of country and territory names within .HONDA, .AXA, .EPSON, .HSBC, .XYZ and .COLLEGE was opened. The public comment forum this request can be found here: https://www.icann.org/public-comments/ctn-release-tlds-2015-03-31-en.

On 13 May 2015, a similar public comment period for the RSEP proposals and amendments for the release of country and territory names within .SONY, .ARCHI, .BIO and .SAARLAND was opened. The public comment forum this request can be found here: https://www.icann.org/public-comments/ctn-release-tlds-2015-05-13-en.

On 26 May 2015, a similar public comment period for the RSEP proposals and amendments for the release of country and territory names within .KOMATSU and .RICOH was opened. The public comment forum this request can be found here: https://www.icann.org/public-comments/ctn-release-tlds-2015-05-26-en.

On 21 June 2015, a similar public comment period for the RSEP proposals and amendments for the release of country and territory names within .GLOBAL, .BNPPARIBAS, .BRIDGESTONE and .FIRESTONE was opened. The public comment forum this request can be found here: https://www.icann.org/public-comments/ctn-release-tlds-2015-06-21-en.

On 1 September 2015, a similar public comment period for the RSEP proposals and amendments for the release of country and territory names within .BROTHER, .GEA, .ACO, .SECURITY, .PROTECTION, .THEATRE and .RENT was opened. The public comment forum this request can be found here: https://www.icann.org/public-comments/ctn-release-tlds-2015-09-01-en.

On 15 December 2015, a similar public comment period for the RSEP proposals and amendments for the release of country and territory names within .STUDY, .COURSES, .LAMBORGHINI, XN–3OQ18VL8PN36A, .VOLKSWAGEN, .BUGATTI, .AUDI and .DELTA was opened. The public comment forum this request can be found here: https://www.icann.org/public-comments/ctn-release-tlds-2015-12-15-en.

On 28 March 2016, a similar public comment period for the RSEP proposals and amendments for the release of country and territory names within .TORAY and .PICTET was opened. The public comment forum this request can be found here: https://www.icann.org/public-comments/ctn-release-tlds-2016-03-28-en.

The current language in Specification 5 of the Registry Agreement regarding the required reservation of country and territory names was included in response to advice from the Governmental Advisory Committee (GAC) during the development of the New gTLD Program (see this exchange of letters between the ICANN President and the GAC dated 17 March 2009 [PDF, 244 KB] and 24 April 2009 [PDF, 95 KB].

Furthermore, the GAC commented on this topic in the Singapore Communiqué [PDF, 449 KB] published on 27 March 2014. The GAC noted that it “discussed the Brand Registry Group proposal for a streamlined process under an addendum to the Registry Agreement for the approval of country names and 2-letter and character codes at the second level.” The GAC stated that it “has no major concerns about brand owners seeking approval for such names,” but that the approval should be “done directly with the countries concerned rather than through a GAC-level operational process.” The GAC noted that “individual GAC members could assist with proposals relevant to their particular country if requested,” and further suggested that “consideration be given to establishing a register of countries that do not require individual requests to be made“. Subsequent to the GAC‘s Singapore Communiqué, on 8 August 2014, the GAC confirmed its intent to review the proposed release of country and territory names as well (see 10 September 2014 letter from the GAC Chair to the Chairman of the ICANN Board). In the GAC‘s Los Angeles Communiqué [PDF, 127 KB] (15 October 2014), the GAC noted that “It will review the use of country and territory names at the second level and advice the ICANN Board in due course”.

In the GAC‘s Singapore Communiqué [PDF, 113 KB] (11 February 2015), the GAC advised ICANN Board to “work with the GAC to develop a public database to streamline the process for the release of country and territory names at the second level, as outlined in Specification 5. The database will inform whether individual GAC Members intend to agree to all requests, review them case by case, or not agree to any. The absence of input from a government will not be considered as agreement.”

Subsequent to the GAC‘s Singapore Communiqué (11 February 2015), on 23 April 2015, the GAC Chair sent a letter [PDF, 180 KB] to the Chairman of the ICANN Board, confirming its intent to work on a proposal for the development of such database for the process for release of country and territory names. The GAC indicated in its letter that “The GAC has started to work on a proposal for such a database and on related aspects of the process for release of country and territory names. This work has priority status for the GAC and a proposal will soon be shared with ICANN. In the meantime, it is the expectation of the GAC that a realistic timeline will be followed, and that existent RSEP requests will not be approved before an adequate process involving the GAC and individual governments in the release of country and territory names at the second level has been developed.”

Also it is stated in the GAC‘s Buenos Aires Communiqué [PDF, 107 KB] (24 June 2015) that “the GAC is continuing to develop a database of country requirements for notification of requests for release of country/territory names at the second level in new gTLDs (reserved according to the application rules for new gTLDs), with options for governments to state that they do not object to release and abstain from notifications for such requests”. The list was finalised and published on the GAC website on 30 July 2015.

On 12 October 2015, ICANN published the Country and Territory Names webpage to provide information regarding names currently reserved under Specification 5 Section 4 of the New gTLD Registry Agreement. The webpage provides clarification regarding the Governmental Advisory Committee Notification Requirements list established to facilitate notification of registry requests for release of country and territory names as second-level domains in new gTLDs.

To access the Country and Territory Names webpage, please visit https://www.icann.org/resources/country-territory-names.

ICANN will consider these comments along with the advice from the GAC as it considers whether or not to approve the requested amendments.

Section III: Relevant Resources

Section IV: Additional Information

This ICANN announcement was sourced from:
https://www.icann.org/public-comments/ctn-release-tlds-2016-04-27-en

IWF Finds Child Abuse On 2,000 Domains Including Over 400 New gTLDs In 2015

The UK’s Internet Watch Foundation found 68,092 URLs containing child sexual abuse imagery and hosted on 1,991 domains worldwide according to their latest annual report published Thursday.The IWF, the UK online child sexual abuse charity, found these 68,092 URLs hosting child sexual abuse content were traced to 48 countries, which is an increase from 45 in 2014. And five top level domains (.com, .net, .ru, .org and .se) accounted for 91 percent of all webpages identified as containing child sexual abuse images and videos.And for the first time the IWF saw these new gTLDs being used to share child sexual abuse imagery. The IWF believes many of these domains in new gTLDs have been registered specifically for that purpose.The IWF took action on 436 websites in 2015 using new gTLD domains to share child sexual abuse material. 138 of these were disguised websites.To assist registries and registrars that are members of IWF in taking down domain names that are used to host child sexual abuse content, the IWF has a Domain Alerts service to prevent abuse of their services by criminals attempting to share child sexual abuse imagery. This service appears to have commenced last year.The service works through IWF analysts identifying new child sexual abuse images and videos. Domain registries or registrars are sent immediate alerts if any child sexual abuse material is discovered on any domains registered through or by them.In the domain name business, members include Nominet, who provide registry services for .uk, .wales and .cymru, ICM Registry who operates .xxx, .adult and .porn, Afilias, GoDaddy, Rightside, names.co.uk and DotLondon.The main finding of the report reveals a staggering increase in the number of reports of illegal child sexual abuse images and videos that the IWF removed from the internet last year.68,092 reports were positively identified as containing illegal child sexual abuse imagery and taken down. This is a 417 percent increase in online confirmed reports over two years and an 118 percent increase in illegal child abuse imagery over the previous year.Data from IWF’s 2015 Annual Report, show their analysts have seen a dramatic increase in reports. This is since Prime Minister David Cameron gave his approval for the IWF to start proactively searching for online child sexual abuse imagery in April 2014.The IWF’s annual report is available for download from:
https://www.iwf.org.uk/accountability/annual-reports/2015-annual-report

Very Small Business Unrealised Market For Domain Registrations

GoDaddy Its Go Time logoSmall businesses around the world are an unrealised market for domain registrations, according to a recent global survey commissioned by GoDaddy. The survey found 59 percent of small businesses report that they don’t yet have their own website. But many of these say they will soon, fuelling a demand by small business for domain registrations and associated services such as webhosting.

“While we take for granted that everyone is online, the reality is that for many small businesses it’s simply not true,” said Blake Irving, GoDaddy CEO. “What is clear is that these very small businesses are realizing that if they don’t fully engage online, they are at a competitive disadvantage.”

The RedShift Research survey of 4,000 global very small businesses – defined as five workers or less – in Australia, Brazil, Canada, India, Mexico, Turkey, United Kingdom, and United States – found 35 percent said they viewed their company as just too small to warrant a website. Yet at the same time, many small businesses reported that they understood that they placed themselves at a competitive disadvantage by not having their own website.

According to the research, a major wave of very small businesses will be taking full advantage of the internet soon: 55 percent report they intend to create their own website in the next two years. And they expect that having their own online presence will significantly boost growth by finally making their businesses visible to local, national and international audiences:

  • Forty-eight percent believe that their business will grow 25 percent or more over the next 3-5 years. Eighty-one percent said they expect growth of 10 percent or more. This is not an unrealistic expectation — of those respondents who already have a website, 59 percent say their business grew once they had built their website.
  • Forty-eight percent said they intend to sell goods from their website (e-commerce functionality) within a year of its launch.
  • Fifty-two percent said creating a website will expand their customer base locally while one in 10 believe it will expend their customer base nationally and internationally.
  • Eighty-four percent said it’s important their new website be mobile-friendly.

Perhaps most telling is the comparison of growth expectations with those with no plans to build a website. According to RedShift, those with no plans to build a website in the next two years have lower expectations for their business with just 19 percent saying they expect 25-50 percent growth in the next 3-5 years.

In addition to growth, competition is a key motivator in creating a website: 83 percent of small business owners who already own a website feel they have a competitive advantage over those without.

There are over 200 million small businesses in the world, but for many, making the leap to have their own website is challenging: survey respondents said they hadn’t had the time, money or expertise to create a website:

  • 35 percent said they viewed their company as just too small to warrant one.
  • 21 percent said it was beyond their technical expertise.
  • 20 percent reported that they couldn’t afford it.

The research also found that size and age matters when it comes to viewing a small business as website-ready.  Newer small businesses were nearly twice as likely to plan to create a website as their older counterparts (72 percent in business 3 or less years compared to 42 percent of those in business 4 or more years). And one-person shops were less likely to plan to build a website (42 percent) than firms of 2-5 people (65 percent).

Very small businesses that create their own website will have an impact on how they communicate with their customers. While those planning to build a website are as likely to telephone a customer as they are to email them, the survey found that those already with a website were twice as likely to communicate via email as to phone. That suggests that as these very small businesses get their own online presence, their communication practices will change, perhaps as they become more digitally sophisticated and their customer base grows.

The research also captured interesting demographic data about those very small businesses operators intending to build a website:

  • 41 percent are run by women.
  • 64 percent have 100 or less customers.
  • 39 percent have been in business for three or less years.

The RedShift research found that of the very small businesses intending to build a website, only one in five have bought a domain name for it. In addition, the research showed they are likely to take different paths towards turning that website into reality. Thirty-percent said they are looking for a internet company to help them build it, while others are looking for a web designer (24 percent), asking family to help (21 percent) or intend to do it themselves (17 percent).

The survey was conducted by RedShift Research of 4,009 very small businesses (1-5 employees) in June and July, 2015. Data is available upon request. For more information about the survey, including a free copy of the complete results, please visit https://garage.godaddy.com.

GoDaddy Parked Domain Programme Ruled Not Cybersquatting

GoDaddy’s parked domain programme has been ruled not to be cybersquatting in a case brought by the organisation that runs the Oscars in the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California.The 129 page ruling on 10 September said “the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences failed to show that GoDaddy had acted in bad faith in allowing customers to register and ‘park’ domain names that incorporated trademarks such as ‘Oscar’ and ‘Academy Award’,” reported Bloomberg BNA.The Academy sued in 2010 accusing GoDaddy of “letting customers ‘park’ their pages on the Internet and share in revenue collected from advertising on those pages,” according to Reuters, seeking “statutory damages of $100,000 per infringement, equal to more than $29 million, court papers showed.””Birotte, however, said GoDaddy ‘reasonably relied’ on its users’ representations that their domain registrations did not infringe any trademarks, including the Academy’s.””Furthermore,” reported BNA, “the court pointed to GoDaddy’s own industry-leading efforts to police trademark violations by its customers that went beyond its legal obligations.””Given those efforts, the court rejected the academy’s argument that GoDaddy had the technological capacity to do even more to protect the academy’s trademark interests.”For more details see the BNA Bloomberg report here and the Reuters report here.

GoDaddy To Sell Shares, Offer IPO, To Raise $100m

GoDaddy, the world’s largest domain name registrar and webhost, has announced plans to offer an initial public offering of shares that will raise around $100m.The number of shares to be offered and the price range for the offering have not yet been determined, and the initial estimate is just a placeholder until closer to the offering date meaning the amount raised is likely to be significantly higher. But the company has not made a profit since 2009.In a filing with the Security and Exchange Commission on Monday, it showed the company lost $279 million in 2012, bled another $200 million last year on revenues of more than $1.1bn and 2014 doesn’t look much better, with another $51 million lost in the first quarter, according to CNN and The Guardian‘s analysis of the filing.”What’s going on? The company’s still recovering from a bad stretch. It was mired in debt back in 2011, when three private equity firms came to the rescue: KKR & Co., Silver Lake Partners and Technology Crossover Ventures.” The companies reportedly paid around $2.25 billion to buy a major stake in the company.In a separate but related announcement, GoDaddy announced founder Bob Parsons has resigned his position as Executive Chairman of the Board in order to devote more time to his ventures outside of GoDaddy. Parsons will continue to serve on the board of directors.”Bob’s vision and uncommon approach has created a great company, and a loyal customer base. Bob built GoDaddy into the world’s largest domain name and Web hosting provider, and his contribution to GoDaddy, and our industry in general, is immeasurable,” said GoDaddy CEO Blake Irving. “As a board member and principal shareholder, Bob will continue to play an important role as we define the next chapter for GoDaddy.””Blake and his team have chartered an awesome course for the company,” said Parsons. “They’ve got a true passion for our customers and a vision for how we translate that into products and services to help organizations of all types and sizes succeed. I look forward to focusing on my new ventures, while continuing to guide the strategic direction of GoDaddy in my role as a board member.”A registration statement relating to these securities has been filed with the US Securities and Exchange Commission but has not yet become effective. These securities may not be sold, nor may offers to buy be accepted, prior to the time the registration statement becomes effective.Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC, J.P. Morgan Securities LLC and Citigroup Global Markets Inc. are acting as lead joint book-running managers for the proposed offering, Barclays Capital Inc., Deutsche Bank Securities Inc. and RBC Capital Markets, LLC are acting as book-running managers for the proposed offering, and KKR Capital Markets LLC and Stifel, Nicolaus & Company, Incorporated are acting as co-managers for the proposed offering.

What’s Happening With .XYZ?

dotXYZ logoIt’s not unusual that some of the newly launched gTLDs have registrars with higher market shares than usual. For example, German registrars have a much higher market share for some of the German gTLDs. In .berlin’s case, the top ten is dominated with German registrars. And overall, GoDaddy has around a quarter (24.69%) of all registrations of new gTLDs.

But the newly launched gTLD, .xyz, has something strange happening. Over 70 percent (72.55%) of the 38,160 domains registered at the time of writing for the gTLD that entered general availability this week are registered through Network Solutions according to nTLDstats.com.

Looking more deeply into the issue as The Domains did, they found Network Solutions is offering “free .xyz domains to certain customers on an opt out basis, meaning that many of these customers may not even know they have an .xyz domain.”

“If we back out the NSI registrations .xyz still had over 11,000 registrations in its first 24 hours or so more than .ninja still a week after launch.”

Without these strange happenings, The Domains notes there would have been at least 11,000 registrations on day one of general availability which is still brilliant.

10×10: Ten gTLDs and Ten Registrars Pass 10,000 Mark For New gTLDs

ICANN new generic Top Level Domains logoTen new gTLDs and ten registrars have now passed the 10,000 registrations mark. The gTLD with the most registrations continues to be .guru with 47,944 as of 4 April, while .berlin is closing the gap with 44,386 according to nTLDstats.com.

In the period 22 March to 4 April there were 2,186 .guru registrations, while from 22 March to 3 April there were 4,226 .berlin registrations.

However total numbers vary from the nTLDstats.com home page to the page for individual gTLDs. But it is clear that .berlin is closing the gap on .guru.

For registrars, GoDaddy continues to dominate with 130,344 registrations and three in ten (30.01%) registrations.

Meanwhile, the top ten gTLDs are with registrations and market share are:
1.     .guru     47,944     11.04%
2.     .berlin     44,386     10.22%
3.     .photography     31,138     7.17%
4.     .tips     18,379     4.23%
5.     .today     18,340     4.22%
6.     .email     18,328     4.22%
7.     .company     13,141     3.03%
8.     .technology     12,681     2.92%
9.     .directory     11,582     2.67%
10.     .center     10,424     2.40%.

And on the registrar side of things, the top ten gTLDs with registrations and market share are:
1.     Godaddy LLC     130,344     30.01%
2.     1&1 Internet AG     43,973     10.12%
3.     Enom, Inc.     41,092     9.46%
4.     united-domains AG     39,077     9.00%
5.     Cronon AG     17,144     3.95%
6.     Name.com, Inc.     14,685     3.38%
7.     Tucows Domains Inc.     13,386     3.08%
8.     Mesh Digital Limited     13,221     3.04%
9.     PSI-USA, Inc. dba Domain Robot     13,217     3.04%
10.     Key-Systems, LLC     11,564     2.66%

New gTLD Registrations Hit 400,000

The number of registrations in the 150 new gTLDs to have at least one registration has reached 400,000, nTLDStats.com data showed Friday. As of 30 March there were 408,366 domains registered across all gTLDs.The top new gTLD is still .guru with 46,954 domains under management (DUM) and a 11.54 percent market share of all new gTLDs as of 30 March. But it is being gradually caught by .berlin with 43,403 DUM and a 10.66 percent market share.Third on the list compiled by nTLDStats.com is .photography (30,185 and 7.41%), then .today (17,666 and 4.34%), .tips (17,583 and 4.32%). Sixth on the list is .email with 15,216 DUM and a market share of 3.74 percent, however General Availability only commenced on a week ago on 23 March.Rounding out the top ten is .technology (12,262 and 3.01%), .company (12,121 and 2.98%), .directory (11,299 and 2.78%) and .clothing (9,714 and 2.39%).Among registrars, GoDaddy has three in every ten registrations with 122,196 domains, or a 30.02 percent market share. But it is the German registrars that have done well, undoubtedly boosted by the success of .berlin, with 1&1 Internet AG (41,327 and 10.15%) and united-domains AG (37,901 and 9.31%) both having around one in ten registrations.There are some interesting breakdowns for what gTLDs are popular with which registrars. For example, instra has .plumbing at the top of its list with 315 registrations, or 13.48 percent of registrations, while .guru is its second most popular gTLD with 146 registrations. The second most popular gTLD though, .berlin, comes 41st with 14 registrations.And EuroDNS has .guru at the top of its list with 231registrations, or 12.95 percent of registrations, while .technology is its second most popular gTLD with 105 registrationsand .solutions is third (104) The second most popular gTLD though, .berlin, comes sixth with 70 registrations.