Tag Archives: European Union

.EU Registrations Continue To Grow Strongly

Registrations of .eu (European Union) domain names grew by more than seven percent in Q3 2012 year over year for the second consecutive quarter, the latest progress report from the .eu registry, EURid says. The third quarter’s net growth rate of 7.4 percent was consistent with Q2’s 7.6 percent result.But despite this impressive growth, .eu slipped from the tenth to the eleventh largest TLD with 3.67m domain names at the end of the third quarter. The registry notes that this has been caused by changes in the top level domain environment. An example given is .TK, the ccTLD for Tokelau, which gives away domain names for free and now has over 13 million registrations.At the end of the third quarter there were 3.67 million .eu domain names, compared to .com, the world’s largest TLD with 105.79 million registered domain names and .de (Germany) the world’s largest ccTLD, and second largest TLD, with 15.27 million registered domain names.Next is .net with 14.88 million registrations, .tk (Tokelau – approximately 13 million), .uk (United Kingdom – 10.24m), .org (10.10m), .info (7.24m), .nl (5.12m), .ru (Russia – 4.16m), .cn (China – 3.98m) and then .eu, now with 3.70m.”.eu registrations have risen steadily during 2012, with the Q3 results supporting our sustainable growth targets,” said EURid’s General Manager, Marc Van Wesemael. “During tough economic times, doing business online becomes ever more attractive. I see .eu’s growth as evidence of this trend across Europe.”EURid’s Q3 2012 report shows that Malta had the highest annual growth, a 35 percent rise in .eu registrations compared with Q3 2011, followed by Slovakia (22%) and Austria (21%). During the same period, registrations grew by over 15 percent annually in a further four European Union countries: the Czech Republic, Greece, Lithuania and Slovenia..eu completed the third quarter of 2012 with 3.67 million registered domain names. Across the EU, there were 8% more new .eu registrations in Q3 than during the same quarter in 2011. During these three months, Greece, Malta, Slovakia and Spain all increased by 5% or more.The full Q3 2012 report is available for download at link.eurid.eu/reports.TLD registration statistics come from Registrar Stats while ccTLD statistics come from registry websites.

.EU Registrations Grow 7.6% In Q2 2012 To 3.6m

EURid logoRegistrations of .EU domain names continue to grow strongly with an increase of 7.6 percent in the year to the end of June 2012, according to the latest progress report from the .EU top level domain registry, EURid. This built on the 6.1 percent year-on-year increase reported in Q1 2012.

The second quarter includes the anniversary for when .EU was launched in April 2006 and traditionally sees more domain name deletions than other quarters, and hence a decline in registrations. However, Q2 2012 was different from previous second quarters. This year there was a quarterly net growth of 0.2 percent showing that 2012’s April anniversary had the smallest impact yet.

.EU is now the tenth largest TLD, and sixth largest ccTLD. .COM is the largest with 103.4m registrations, followed by (Germany) with 15.2m, .NET (14.7m), .TK (Tokelau – 11.2m), .UK (United Kingdom – 10.2m), .ORG (10m), .INFO (8.2m), .NL (Netherlands – 5.0m), .RU (Russian Federation – 4.0m) and .EU now with close to 3.7m.*

“.EU has maintained healthy registration rates for the first six months of this year, a fact reinforced by the Q2 2012 results,” said EURid’s General Manager, Marc Van Wesemael. “I am heartened by this growth which shows that Europeans continue to want .eu domain names despite the economic and political crisis still affecting Europe.”

EURid’s Q2 2012 report shows that Lithuania had the highest annual growth, with a 30 percent increase of .EU registrations compared with Q2 2011, followed by Malta (29%) and Austria (23%). During the same period, registrations in a further six European Union countries grew by over 10 percent, namely Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, France, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia.

.EU completed the second quarter of 2012 with 3.60 million registered domain names. During these three months, the Czech Republic, Lithuania, Poland and Slovakia all saw quarterly growth of five percent or more.

Also during the quarter EURid launched YADIFA, an open-source name server implementation, as well as reducing fees for their Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) service by 50 percent.

YADIFA is for TLD operators and Internet Service Providers alike and is designed specifically for the efficient management of large internet zones and uses dynamic updates to instantly change domain name records. It is equally optimised to handle multiple Internet zones. The source code is also freely available.

The full report for Q2 2012 is available for download at link.eurid.eu/reports.

* the registration figures for ccTLDs above are updated from the EURid report with figures from the registry websites with the exception of .TK.

Four Millionth .RU Domain Registered

RU Coordination Center logoThe four millionth .RU (Russian Federation) domain name has been registered with total registrations approaching 4.004 million as this article is published.

.RU is the fifth largest ccTLD behind .DE (Germany) with 15.2 million registrations, followed by .TK (Tokelau) however the registry does not publish registration statistics for its free domain names. Third is .UK (United Kingdom – 10.2m) then .NL (Netherlands – 5.04m), .RU, .CN (China – 4.13m as of 31 July), .EU (European Union – 3.67m), .BR (Brazil – 3.05m), .AR (Argentina – figures unknown) and then .AU, currently with 2.52m registrations.

More to come.

.AU Passes 2.5 Million Registered Domains

The number of registered .AU (Australia) domain names passed the 2.5 million mark in late August, auDA and AusRegistry announced.Since passing two million registrations in March 2011, the .AU namespace has grown at a steady pace thanks, the regulatory and policy body and registry note, to the combined efforts of accredited registrars in promoting .AU as Australia’s home on the internet. Approximately 86 percent of all .AU domain names are registered under .com.au.According to Verisign’s latest Domain Name Industry Brief, .AU is the tenth largest ccTLD. The largest is .DE (Germany) with almost 15.19 million registrations today. Second is probably .TK (Tokelau) however the registry does not publish registration statistics for its free domain names, followed by .UK (United Kingdom – 10.2m), .NL (Netherlands – 5.03m), .RU (Russian Federation – 3.99m) .CN (China – 4.13m as of 31 July), .EU (European Union – 3.65m), .BR (Brazil – 3.05m), .AR (Argentina – figures unknown) and then .AU, currently with 2.51m registrations.

Daily Wrap: EU Says ITU Should Not Have More Power, Kiwi Fight Over TLDs, .SA, .EE, .IE Awards And Aeroflot.xxx Dispute

There may be a case for governments having more say in the way the internet is run, EU digital commissioner Neelie Kroes told ZDNet last week, but — even if this were to happen — it would not necessitate giving the ITU more power.

“Of course there are voices saying it would be better with the UN [but] I’m not in favour of the line that, if you have a problem, you can only solve it in a new structure,” Kroes said, adding that it was first worth examining the calls for more government input.

“I still think that the remarks that are made [about giving governments a greater voice] can be included in a solution within the structure of today,” she said. “I’m not aware that that can’t be done, so I’m not willing to [favour] a new structure.”

The creation of the kiwi.nz second level domain will only cause confusion, the applicant for the .KIWI gTLD has said.

Tim Johnson, chief executive of Dot Kiwi Ltd told the New Zealand Herald approving kiwi.nz was not in the best interests of internet users “or in fact the internet in New Zealand”.

“Why would potential registrants want .kiwi.nz when they could have .KIWI?”

SaudiNIC has started a process of updating Whois details for .SA domain names, sending out requests to registrants to check and if necessary update their registrant details.

ICANN’s board of directors is set to approve مليسيا., the Arabic name for Malaysia, at a meeting next week, Domain Incite reported.

The Estonian Internet Foundation announced the public procurement for an audit of the code of the information systems (Domain Registry Software Security Audit) it uses, the organisation announced last week. The bid submission deadline is 10 September 2012.

Over to Ireland and the Irish Internet Association has announced the shortlist for this year’s Dot ie Net Visionary Awards and online voting is now open.

Aeroflot, the Russian airline, has won a dispute lodged with the WIPO Arbitration and Mediation Center over the aeroflot.xxx domain name, however the original registrant does not agree with the ruling and is threatening to appeal.

.ORG Sixth Largest TLD As Registrations Grow Strongly

Public Interest Registry .ORG logoThe number of .ORG domain names grew by 7.7 per cent in the first half of 2012 compared to the same period in 2011, with the total number of domains registered totalling 9.9 million at the end of June, the Public Interest Registry revealed in its latest bi-annual report The Dashboard.

The number of .ORG domain names now totals 10.064 million with the ten millionth registration happening on 24 June according to a PIR news release dated 11 July. So either registrations temporarily went backwards or there are several ways to count .ORG domain names!

The report also notes the number of registered .ORG domain names increased from 3.9 million in 2006 to 9.9 million by the end of June 2012 – a net gain of 305,948 for the first half of the year and an increase of 154 percent over seven years.

The largest TLD globally is naturally .COM with around 104.127m domain names registered. Second is .DE (Germany) with 15.159m registrations then .NET (14.767m). Following is .TK (Tokelau – 10.5m), .UK (United Kingdom – 10.179m), .ORG (10.055m), .INFO (8.118m).NL (Netherlands – 5.015m), .RU (Russian Federation – 3.928m), .EU (European Union – 3.644m) and then .BR (3m).

The blended renewal rate for .ORG, the average renewal rate from the first to the third year, of existing .ORG websites for the first half of 2012 was 75.4 per cent.

PIR has also applied for six new top level domains: .NGO, .ONG and four internationalised domains that translate into “organisation,” “org” or “structured organisation” in Devanagari, Cyrillic and Chinese-simplified scripts.

“We have seen tremendous growth of the .ORG domain over the last few years, underscoring the fact that .ORG remains the go-to online home for individuals and companies advancing their cause or mission,” said Brian Cute, CEO of Public Interest Registry. “What’s more is that the year ahead also promises to be an exciting one for PIR. Not only will we remain focused on continuing to expand the .ORG domain globally and in new markets such as India, Russia and China, but we will also be introducing complementary domain options – such as .NGO or .ONG – that will, like .ORG, serve as trusted online venues for nonprofit and nongovernmental communities worldwide.”

For more information on “The Dashboard” or to download a copy, see pir.org/news

Three Million .BR Domains

NIC.br logoThe three millionth .BR domain name was registered on 31 July the Brazilian registry announced this week.

The Brazilian ccTLD is the seventh largest ccTLD NIC.br noted in their news release. The registry says the large number of .BR domain names proves Brazilians prefer their own ccTLD.

Assisting the growth of .BR NIC.br notes has been the implementation of DNSSEC, the creation of a number of second level domains (b.br for banks, jus.br for the judiciary and leg.br for government as well as emp.br and eco.br) as well as making it easier to register domains and providing better infrastructure.

The largest ccTLD is .DE (Germany) with 15.1 million active registrations, followed by .TK (Tokelau – 10.5m), .UK (United Kingdom – 10.2m), .NL (Netherlands – 5m), .RU (Russian Federation – 3.9m), .EU (European Union – 3.6m) and then .BR.

.EU Registrants Must Have Presence in EU, Europe’s Highest Court Rules

Only companies with an established presence in Europe Union were able to take advantage of the sunrise period for trademark holders and to register.EU domain names the European Union’s highest court ruled Thursday.The ruling by the EU Court of Justice came about following a dispute over the domain name lensworld.eu between the Belgian eyewear company Pie Optiek SPRL that sells its products online and intellectual property consultant Bureau Gevers SA.In their claim, Pie Optiek seeks, first, a declaration that Bureau Gevers’ registration of that domain name was speculative and abusive. Second, Pie Optiek seeks to have that domain name transferred to it. Pie Optik argued that Bureau Gevers has no right to the registration of the domain name as it is not itself a ‘holder of a prior right’ or trademark.During the sunrise period, Bureau Gevers filed an application for the domain name ‘lensworld.eu’ and secured its registration before Pie Optiek.In the judgement outline of the case, Pie Optik had argued that:
“the holder of such a right is the United States company Walsh Optical. However, Walsh Optical is not entitled to apply for registration as its registered office is not within the European Union and, consequently, it does not meet the legal requirements. According to Pie Optiek, in order to circumvent the eligibility criteria, Walsh Optical and Bureau Gevers implemented a strategy consisting in the conclusion of an agreement entitled ‘Licence Agreement’, whereby Bureau Gevers agreed to lend its name and address within the European Union in order to allow its United States client to register the domain name at issue. In addition, Pie Optiek questions whether the agreement at issue can be regarded as a licence agreement at all within the legal meaning of that term, as Bureau Gevers was authorised simply to register but not to make use of the trade mark, for example, for the purpose of marketing of goods or services under that trade mark.”The question that arose in the case was “whether it is compatible with European Union (‘EU’) law to allow a company which, by reason of its establishment in a third country, is not an eligible party, nevertheless to register a domain name on the basis of a licence agreement with a company that is established in the European Union.”In the judgement, the court ruled that “the agreement concluded between Walsh Optical and Bureau Gevers did not provide for the use of the trade mark or the corresponding domain name for the purposes of trade.” Which meant Bureau Gevers could not be regarded as a ‘licensee of a prior right’. The judgement noted that Walsh Optical had no link to the European Union, which was one of the prerequisites for a .EU domain. The ruling noted “that the .EU TLD was intended to ‘provide a clearly identified link with the Community, the associated legal framework, and the European market place’.””Consequently, it would also be contrary to the spirit and purpose of Regulation No 733/2002 to allow an undertaking that is not an eligible party to obtain registration of the domain name sought. That would also have to be the case where the provisions governing eligibility for registration are ultimately circumvented in so far as registration is achieved by means of a legal construction such as the commissioning of a third-party organisation that is resident in the European Union and therefore eligible to apply.”The judgement is available for download in all main European languages. The English version, and links to other languages, is available from:
curia.europa.eu/juris/celex.jsf?celex=62011CC0376&lang1=en&type=NOT&ancre=

Individuals Able To Register .CN Domains

CNNIC logoChina began accepting applications from individuals for .cn and .中国”, the Chinese internationalised domain name, on Tuesday the China Internet Network Information Center (CNNIC) said.

Any individual or organisation that can carry independent civil liabilities has the right to apply for the domain registration under the implementing rules,” said CNNIC.

CNNIC, the registry for .CN, stopped individuals applying for .CN domain names in December 2009 due to what they said was because a large number of domains were being used to distribute illegal material such as pornography and gambling sites. To combat this, the Ministry of Public Security launched a series of public campaigns targeting cybercrimes.

The new act will help the development of individual micro-application platforms and e-commerce as well. Individual online shops can possess their own .cn domains which will help their brand operation, Qi Lin, vice-director of CNNIC, told Xinhua News.

“Individuals will become the major drive for the development of websites in China,” said Qi. “Reopening the domain name registration right to individuals is expected to boost the openness and uniqueness of the Internet.”

There were around 2.3 million .CN domain names at the end of 2011, up 20 per cent year-on-year, according to CNNIC’s most recent statistics. The ccTLD is also the seventh largest in the world, behind .DE (Germany) with 15.1 million registrations, the world’s largest, .UK (United Kingdom – 10.1m), .TK (Tokelau), .NL (Netherlands – 4.95m), .RU (Russia – 3.85m), and .EU (European Union – 3.6m).

Europe Registry logoTo register your domain name, check out Europe Registry here.

Europe Seeks More Influence on Governing Internet

A series of six papers from the European Commission “represent a wholesale effort to put governments in charge of the internet” writes Kieren McCarthy.”They would be put in a position to decide how the internet’s underlying naming structure – the domain name system – expands and evolves.”If the DNS evolves in the right way of course, governments won’t need to do anything, they will let others get on with it. But just in case people decide to do something that isn’t in the public’s interest, then governments will be there to firmly but politely inform them that they are not allowed to do that. Well, that’s the theory anyway.”To read McCarthy’s analysis of the papers and the players and what is going on, check out his posting on his Dot NXT site at news.dot-nxt.com/2011/08/31/ec-papers-analysis.