Tag Archives: .DK

DK Hostmaster Running Courses On How To Protect Your Domain Name

DK Hostmaster is running free courses on IT security in May at their offices in Copenhagen. The courses are to help gain an insight into different techniques to tighten security of domain names.

The courses are run over 4 days from 6 to 9 May and each day’s course is listed below:

  • Monday, May 6: learn to understand DNS concepts, configurations and basic security aspects of DNS
  • Tuesday, May 7: introduction to DMARC, which can effectively upgrade the security of email systems.
  • Wednesday, May 8: learn more about DNSSEC, which is a signing method that prevents hackers from changing the name server process and thereby take control of a domain name.
  • Thursday, May 9: learn to understand the latest developments in email and web traffic protection and learn about DANE, which is an extension of the security offered by DNSSEC.

All courses take place at DK Hostmaster in Ørestaden, Copenhagen and include catering.

To register, send an e-mail to registration@dk-hostmaster.dk with name, company name and course title.

.DK Introducing Domain Name Transfer Fee

DK Hostmaster is to introduce a fee for transferring .dk domain names for the first time as of 1 January 2019. The fee will be DKK50 (€6.70/US$7.60).

DK Hostmaster, Denmark’s country code top level domain (ccTLD) registry, said in their announcement the fee must be paid when the new registrant accepts the transfer on DK Hostmaster’s self-service portal.

The new fee covers the administrative costs associated with the transfer. For registrants with more than one user ID, they will still be able to bring all their .dk domain names under the user ID by using the “Merge User ID” feature using DK Hostmaster’s “self-service”, but only if the domain names have the same registrant information.

There are 1.322 million .dk domain names, with registrations declining by about 90,000 in the last 12 months. There are also 72,000 internationalised .dk domain names and 24,000 signed with DNSSEC.

DK Hostmaster Wins Global Award For Efforts Combating Cybercrime

The Alliance for Safe Online Pharmacies (ASOP Global) presented its annual Internet Pharmacy Safety E-Commerce Leadership Award to .DK Hostmaster, which was announced at ICANN63 Tuesday.

DK Hostmaster, the Danish country code top level domain (ccTLD) manager, won the award based on their commitment to ensuring citizen safety by maintaining transparent WHOIS data, proactively enforcing identity accuracy policies to increase consumer trust and safety online.

DK Hostmaster has increased identity checks for Danish and foreign customers and deleted over 3,000 domain names of suspected fake stores since November 2017. In addition, DK Hostmaster supports an open WHOIS, which is helping to create transparency so it continuously is possible to see who is behind a .dk domain name.

“ASOP Global is pleased to recognise DK Hostmaster for their outstanding efforts to prevent the illegal use of domain names for online drug sales and rapidly responding to any complaints,” said Libby Baney, Principal at Faegre Baker Daniels Consulting and senior advisor to ASOP Global.

ASOP Global is a 501(c)(4) non-profit organisation headquartered in Washington, D.C. with activities in the U.S., Canada, Europe, India, Latin America and Asia. It’s dedicated to protecting consumers around the world, ensuring safe access to medications, and combating illegal online drug sellers.

“DK Hostmaster is honoured to receive this award for our continued efforts to ensure a safe and trustworthy .dk zone through transparency and focus on ensuring the identity of the owners of a .dk domain name” said DK Hostmaster CEO, Jakob Truelsen.

“DK Hostmaster’s policy to keep WHOIS data open and transparent creates a more secure, trustworthy environment in the .dk namespace,” Baney commented. As a member of the Coalition for a Secure and Transparent Internet, ASOP Global further commends DK Hostmaster for their policy on transparent WHOIS and encourages other registries and registrars to follow thier lead.

“Transparency has shown to be an effective tool to prevent abuse. Sunlight has proven to an effective disinfectant” said DK Hostmaster CEO, Jakob Truelsen.

Nominations for ASOP Global’s third Internet Pharmacy E-Commerce Safety Award are now open. Award recipients will be announced during ICANN66 in November 2019 in Montreal, Canada.

DK Hostmaster Optimises Domain Name Registration Flow

DK Hostmaster has announced they updated their systems and modernised the way .dk domain names are registered as of 30 August.

DK Hostmaster say their customers can now easily and quickly can proceed from ordering the domain name at one of their registrars to be able to use the domain name.

They’ve also published their modernised procedures for registering .dk domain names which has 3 steps:

  1. Check to see if the domain name is available in our whois database
  2. Register the domain name through one of our domain name providers
  3. Activate the domain name by completing our ID check if necessary. Read more about ID check

Domain names can be registered for one, 2, 3 or 5 years.

.DK Introduces Stronger Identity Checks And Sees 3,000 Scam Sites Closed

The Danish ccTLD manager, Dansk Internet Forum (DIFO), has reduced the number of online shops engaged in suspicious scams using .dk domain names, such as those selling counterfeit goods, by 3,000 since November 2017 leaving around 50 remaining.

The reduction in the number of suspected scam shops has come about largely due to identity checks introduced in 2017 for both Danish and foreign .dk registrants.

In March 2018, a study conducted on behalf of DIFO showed that the more detailed identity checks had reduced the number of suspected scam web shops to 475. Subsequently, DIFO has further targeted the identity of foreign registrants, which has resulted in only about 50 suspected scam web shops remaining in .dk zone.

One of DIFO’s tasks is to make sure that the Danish part of the Internet is as secure as possible and that there is trust in .dk domain names and websites. One of the ways they have done this is through e-mark, a non-profit organisation representing more than 2,200 Danish companies working with e-commerce. The e-mark certifies good web-shops and gives the consumer confidence they are dealing with a trusted online store.

“We are very pleased with the excellent result DIFO has achieved by reducing the number of scam web shops that end with .dk. One scam shop is one too many, but at the current level, the .dk zone can be considered to be one of the safest zones in the world,” says CEO of the e-mark Jesper Arp-Hansen.

The increased identity checks mean Danish registrants must now be validated with NemID, while all foreign customers are assessed based on a risk assessment. DIFO has thus been able to delete domain names where the registrant has not been able to or would not reveal their identity.

Denmark’s ccTLD Introduces ‘Intensified Control of Registrants Abroad’ Plus New Terms and Conditions

dk-hostmaster-logoDK Hostmaster has introduced “an intensified control of the identity of customers living outside Denmark” in an effort to combat abuse of the country’s ccTLD. The move follows the implementation of mandatory identification with NemID for Danish costumers in November.

One of the reasons given for the change was the number of domain names seized for selling counterfeit goods. In 2017 alone there were 992 .dk domain names seized, the majority to registrants outside Denmark.

DK Hostmaster intends the intensified identity control to ensure Denmark’s country code top level domain is as free of abuse as possible. With this initiative it is expected the number of seized .dk domains will decrease in the future. Documentation required by DK Hostmaster for registrants living abroad will be assessed on a case-by-case basis.

There are also new terms and conditions for .dk domain names. The new T&Cs came into effect on 19 December. The changes involve:

  • Making it more transparent to a DK Hostmaster customer with rewritten terms that are streamlined and reorganised and written in a more understandable language with clarifications in some areas.
  • The T&Cs are also significantly reduced, with a reduction from 35 to 10 pages. The procedures which made up a lot of the T&Cs previously have been taken out and can now be found on the website instead. The terms and conditions are therefore more about registrant rights and obligations.
  • The terms also reflect the substantive changes made to DK Hostmaster products. These include:
    • the proxy will now be able to perform more actions on behalf of the registrant without the registrant having to approve the actions each time. Only in case of transfer and deletion must the registrant confirm the actions.
    • DK Hostmaster will be able to suspend a domain name on the basis of risk of confusion in connection with obvious risk of financial crime.
    • An emphasis on the importance of the registrant keeping contact information updated
    • The implementation of the new identification process.

The changes to the terms and conditions have come about following a consultation with the Danish internet community in 2017.

DK Hostmaster believes these changes will support transparency on the Danish internet and help prevent cybercrime.

E-Shops Selling Counterfeit Goods Often Use Re-Registered Brand Domains, European Study Finds

Companies letting their domain names expire are often finding e-shops are re-registering their domain names and using them to market trademark infringing, or counterfeit, goods. But there’s no correlation between the use of the domain name prior to the e-shop and what the e-shop sells.

The study by the European Union Intellectual Property Office (EUIPO) [pdf], through the European Observatory on Infringements of Intellectual Property Rights, was on online business models used to infringe intellectual property rights. The study found when domain names were available for re-registration the entities operating the e-shops would systematically re-register the domain names and shortly after set up e-shops marketing goods suspected of infringing upon the trademarks of others. It was a characteristic that the prior use of the domain names was completely unrelated to the goods being marketed on the suspected e-shops. There were examples of domain names previously used by politicians, foreign embassies, commercial businesses and many other domain name registrants.

The study was conducted in 2 phases. Phase one looked at .dk (Denmark) from October 2014 to October 2015. During this period 566 .dk domains were re-registered by suspected infringers of trademarks immediately after the domain names had been given up by their previous registrants and became available for re-registration. Phase 2 looked at Sweden, which as a Scandinavian country would be assumed comparable with Denmark, Germany and the United Kingdom, which have very well-developed and large e-commerce sectors, and a country with a large e-commerce sector in southern Europe, Spain.

Phase 2 found the same phenomenon previously documented in Denmark also occurs in the Swedish, German, British and Spanish ccTLDs.

According to the study, the “total number of detected e-shops suspected of infringing the trade marks of others using a domain name under the ccTLD” ranged from 2.9% in .de (Germany) to 9.5% in .se (Sweden) while the “total number of detected e-shops suspected of infringing the trade marks of others using a domain name under the ccTLD where the domain name had been previously used by another registrant” ranged from 71.1 % of suspected e-shops in .uk (United Kingdom) to 81.0% in .es (Spain). The average was 5.41% across all ccTLDs in the study and 75.35% respectively.

Based on the research, the researchers believe it must be considered likely that the same also occurs in other European countries with well-developed e-commerce sectors.

An analysis of the 27,970 e-shops in the study identified a number of patterns including shoes were the product category most affected, accounting for two-thirds (67.5%) of the suspected e-shops and then clothes, accounting for 20.6%, while 94.6% of the detected suspected e-shops used the same specific e-commerce software.

Additionally, 40.78 % of the detected suspected e-shops in Sweden and the United Kingdom were registered through the same registrar, 21.3 % of all the e-shops used the same name server and a quarter (25.9%) of the suspected e-shops had the hosting provider located in Turkey, 19.3 % in the Netherlands and 18.3 % in the United States.

Even if the domain name was previously used for the marketing of goods, the study found the current e-shops were marketing a different type of product at the time of analysis. The study examined 40 case studies that indicated the sole reason for re-registration of the domain names is to benefit from the popularity of the website that was previously identified by the domain name. The benefits would include search engine indexing, published reviews of services and/or products and links from other websites that have not yet taken the current use into consideration. The case studies used also indicate a high degree of affiliation between the e-shops is likely. The research seems to indicate that what on the surface seems like thousands of unrelated e-shops are likely to be one or a few businesses marketing trade mark infringing goods to European consumers.

The 140 page study is available for download from:
https://euipo.europa.eu/tunnel-web/secure/webdav/guest/document_library/observatory/documents/reports/Research_on_Online_Business_Models_Infringing_IP_Rights.pdf

Danish ccTLD Enters Partnership With Police In Fight Against Cybercrime

dk-hostmaster-logoThe Danish registry DK Hostmaster has entered into a partnership with authorities and private internet companies in the fight against financial cybercrime. Following consultations in April that were aimed at cutting crime involving .dk websites, a number of initiatives were identified including increased collaboration, knowledge sharing and optimisation of processes.

One of the challenges identified, especially for smaller police districts, was identifying information about who is behind a website and who has registered the domain name. As a result DK Hostmaster created a guide to what information they hold and how to find it.

The guide for Danish police, in Danish, on what DK Hostmaster provides is available for download from:
https://www.dk-hostmaster.dk/en/release-data-police

ccTLD Updates: .DE, .EU, .IE, .RO, .IT and .DK

DENIC logoDENIC is warning .de domain registrants of German-language emails coming from the forged email address of info@denic.de. The emails claim to acknowledging a domain transfer and have the subject “DENIC eG – Domain-Transfer Bestätigung”. DENIC is advising the emails have nothing to do with them and contain a ZIP file that contains malware.

EURid currently has open the .eu Web Awards. The awards are an online competition where .eu and .eю websites can be nominated for a chance to win a prestigious award to be presented at a stunning ceremony in Brussels.

There are numerous categories including “The Better World”, for ecologically minded websites, and “The Laurels”, for websites that promote ongoing education/Pan-European projects. For more information see webawards.eurid.eu.

The IE Domain Registry has published their annual report for 2015. The report includes a large amount of information for those interested in .ie stats, such as there were 35,225 new .ie registrations in 2015, an increase of 13.4 percent when compared to 2014 (31,072). Accounting for .ie non-renewals or deletions, there was a net increase in registrations of 12,929, an increase of 48 percent on 2014 net registrations.

Turnover increased five percent to €2.86 million. The company registered an operating loss of €517,082 in 2015. The loss is principally accounted for as a result of expenditure of €508,000 on activities under the company’s Strategic Development Fund.

Commencing on 6 July, .ro domain registrants have the option of signing their domain names with DNSSEC the Romanian registry RO TLD has announced.

And get ready for the three millionth .it domain name under management. During May and June there were around 20,000 new .it domain names added to the base meaning they are 40,000 registrations short of the three million milestone. The .it is the ninth largest ccTLD.

Have you ever wondered about what the .dk registry should do about severe violations and misuse of .dk domain names? If so, DIFO invites you to participate in the consultation that extends over the Danish summer.

On 6 June, DIFO held a successful hearing which started a debate about when a domain name can be suspended, how the registrant is validated and what personal information DIFO may pass on.

A large number of representatives from the Danish internet community, from government authorities and the Copenhagen Police to a wide range of IT suppliers participated.

Issues to be considered include should the process of suspending a domain name become faster than it is today? One proposal is to create a special suspension board with responsibility for the suspension of domain names. Can you thereby ensure efficient treatment of cases of evident crime on Danish domain names? What about the legal certainty?

DIFO’s validation of the identity of registrants behind a domain name is currently carried out by letter but perhaps the current validation model should be tightened up? A more restrictive solution with forced NemID validation for Danes and an activation code by post for foreign registrants gained great support at the oral hearing. However there were strong voices against increased control and concerns that domain registration will become too difficult for the customers.

Should DIFO disclose information about anonymous registrants to authorities and individuals quicker and easier than today? DIFO looks forward to see the right holders participate in the written hearing.