Tag Archives: China

Chinese Website Numbers Drop Dramatically in 2010

The number of Chinese websites dropped by 401 per cent in 2010 to 1.91 million websites according to the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences. The dramatic drop was attributed to stronger regulation.”Although the Internet is posing some problems for new media, our regulation is becoming stronger, we have taken a very big step in this area,” CASS media expert Liu Ruisheng was quoted as saying on the organisation’s website reports AFP.But while the number of websites dropped, Liu said Chinese webpages increased in 2010 by 60 billion, an increase of 78.6 percent over 2009 the AFP report continued.”This means our content is getting stronger, while our supervision is getting more strict and more regulated,” he said.The drop in the number of websites corresponds from the decline in .CN domain name registrations. Registrations of .CN domain names plummeted to 3,379,441 active domain names as of 28 February, a decline of over ten million registrations in 14 months, according to statistics published by the China Internet Network Information Center (CNNIC) now not available from their website.The total number of registered domain names declined from a peak of 13,459,133 as of 31 December 2009 when .CN was the number one ccTLD (CNNIC previously published registration statistics dated the end of each month).The decline has meant .CN, which was easily the number one ccTLD at its peak is now at best fifth and probably sixth in terms of total registrations.The dramatic reductions are the result of the end of promotions that lasted for much of 2008 and 2009 where domain names could be registered for a few cents and the introduction of restrictions on registrants.The restrictions on registrants were monitored by 600 temporary workers that were hired in February 2011 to check all .CN domain names for pornographic content and inaccurate records according to an IDG report at the time.

Chinese Internet Information Management Office Established For Domain Registration Management

The Chinese government is establishing a department to manage internet information that “will oversee telecom service providers in their efforts to improve the management of registration of domain names, distribution of IP addresses, registration of websites and Internet access” Xinhua reports.

The department will be called the State Internet Information Office and “will direct, coordinate and supervise online content management and handle administrative approval of businesses related to online news reporting” China’s State Council General Office announced.

As well as providing guidance and assistance in the development of online activities, including “the development of online gaming, online video and audio businesses and online publication industries” it will also undertake some censorship-related activities working “to implement the policies of internet communication and promote legal system construction in this field.”

To read the Xinhua report in full, see:
news.xinhuanet.com/english2010/china/2011-05/04/c_13857911.htm.

Asia Registry logoTo register your .CN domain name, check out Asia Registry here.

.CN Domain Registrations Plummet 10 Million in 14 Months To Under 4 Million

Registrations of .CN (China) domain names have plummeted to 3,379,441 active domain names as of 28 February, a decline of over ten million registrations in 14 months, according to statistics published by the China Internet Network Information Center (CNNIC) in the past week.The total number of registered domain names has declined from a peak of 13,459,133 as of 31 December 2009 when .CN was the number one country code Top Level Domain (CNNIC publishes registration statistics dated the end of each month).The decline has meant .CN, which was easily the number one ccTLD at its peak is now at best fifth and probably sixth in terms of total registrations.The dramatic reductions are the result of the end of promotions that lasted for much of 2008 and 2009 where domain names could be registered for a few cents and the introduction of restrictions on registrants.The restrictions on registrants were monitored by 600 temporary workers that were hired in February 2011 to check all .CN domain names for pornographic content and inaccurate records according to an IDG report at the time.In terms of total registrations, Germany’s ccTLD (.DE) is still the number one registry with 14,304,857 registrations after it regained the position from .CN. Following is:

  • .UK (United Kingdom) with 9,194,231 registrations
  • .NL (Netherlands) with 4,370,120 registrations
  • .EU (European Union) with 3,383,275 registrations.

Russia’s ccTLD, .RU, is steadily increasing and has 3,250,627 active registrations meaning given the trends has probably overtaken .CN.All registrations are as of 2 April.Among the gTLDs, .COM remains number one with around 92 million registrations and .NET with around 13 million as of the end of December 2010, according to VeriSign’s Domain Name Industry Brief. There are approximately nine million .ORG domain names (March 2011) and 6.5 million .INFO domains (September 2010).

Domain Name Update for .HK and .CN

Developments over the last 12 months in the Chinese and Hong Kong ccTLDs are outlined in this article by lawyers from the Hong Kong-based law firm Mayer Brown JSM. The article also gives a quick overview of the new measures and policies adopted by the China Internet Network Information Centre (CNNIC) and Hong Kong Internet Registration Corporation Limited (HKIRC).

The article covers internationalised domain names, the measures introduced in China to strengthen the regulatory framework such as dealing with obscene and illegal content complaints and verification of registrant identities, security and dispute resolution policis.

To read the article in full by Kenny Wong and Alan C.W. Chiu from the law firm Mayer Brown JSM, see www.mayerbrown.com/publications/article.asp?id=10228.

Asia Registry logoTo register your .CN or .HK domain name, check out Asia Registry here.

CN Domain Registrations Slip Even Further

CNNIC logoThe number of .CN domain name registrations have slipped by over one million in the two months to 30 June according to statistics published on the China Internet Network Information Center’s (CNNIC) website this week.

The latest figure is 7,246,686 compared to 8,254,681 at the end of April. CNNIC, unlike many registries, often posts registration figures several months late. Others such as DENIC (.DE) and Nominet (.UK) have real time statistics.

The dramatic reductions are the result of the end of promotions that lasted for much of 2008 and 2009 where domain names could be registered for a few cents and the introduction of restrictions on registrants.

The latest figures mean .CN is still is the third highest ranked ccTLD behind .DE with 13,765,490 registrations as of 7 August and 8,654,260 for .UK (United Kingdom). .NL (Netherlands) is fourth with 3,981,555 registrations while .EU (European Union) is fifth with 3,227,644 registrations.

Europe Registry logoTo register your domain name for any of the above ccTLDs, or any other, check out Europe Registry here.

Go Daddy to Leave China

Following Google’s move to leave China, the registrar Go Daddy has announced it to is going to stop offering .CN domain name registration in testimony before the Congressional-Executive Commission on China.Go Daddy’s General Counsel Christine Jones told members of Congress that her company would discontinue offering new “.cn” domain registrations because of the new registration requirements that commenced last December. The requirements mean registrars have to give the Chinese government a colour image of identity documents, a business license where appropriate and a signed physical contract for each registered domain. The information was to be forwarded to the .CN registry, the China Internet Network Information Center (CNNIC). The requirements are more detailed than most registries that require only a name, address, telephone number and email address.”We were immediately concerned about the motives behind the increased level of registrant verification being required,” Christine N. Jones, general counsel of the Go Daddy Group, told the Congressional-Executive Commission on China on Wednesday. “The intent of the procedures appeared, to us, to be based on a desire by the Chinese authorities to exercise increased control over the subject matter of domain name registrations by Chinese nationals.”Jones also told the Congress committee that Go Daddy customers with .CN domain names have recently been attacked more frequently than in the past.The Chinese government has previously said these requirements are part of its campaign against pornography on the internet.As with allegations that Google’s decision to leave China was at least made easier because it was not making very much money there, and was not likely to do so in the short or medium term, it seems Go Daddy was not being very successful there either. In her testimony, Jones told the Congress committee that Go Daddy there have been around 27,000 .CN domain names registered with Go Daddy since 2005. This is more than any other non-Chinese company but represents less than one per cent of Go Daddy’s revenue.

ICANN CEO’s China Visit Notes

ICANN logoRod Beckstrom, ICANN’s CEO and president, recently visited China on 2-3 March for talks with the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, Industry leaders and CNNIC, the China Internet information Network on his way to the ICANN Nairobi meeting that is currently underway.

The visit was Beckstrom’s first major bilateral visit since he was appointed president and CEO apart from a brief visit to Europe at the end 2009.

In a posting on the ICANN blog, Nick Thorne writes that “during the visit Rod attended a NomComm outreach event designed to encourage greater participation. Organised by the charming and effective Professor Hong Hue, Director of the Institute for Internet policy at Beijing Normal University and in the presence of Madam Qiheng Hu, President of the Internet Society of China. The event was very kindly sponsored by CNNIC, whose Director General, Dr. Wei Mao, also made a very positive contribution to our efforts to encourage greater Chinese participation in our multi-stakeholder model.”

To read the full posting on the ICANN blog and see a couple of photos, go to:
blog.icann.org/2010/03/notes-from-icann-ceos-visit-to-china/

ICANN CEO to Visit China This Week

ICANN logoICANN’s CEO, Rod Beckstrom, will visit China en route to Nairobi this week, reports IDG. Discussions due to take place are expected to include talks on China’s application to ICANN “for the globally supported use of domain names that end in “dot-China,” with the word “China” written in Chinese script,” a source said.

Nobody from ICANN was available to comment on the story.

To read the IDG report in full, see:
www.pcworld.com/article/190391/.html
www.networkworld.com/news/2010/030110-icann-head-visiting-china-after.html

.CN Takes Censorship One Step Further

China has taken its censorship of .CN websites a step further following CNNIC’s hiring of 600 temporary workers to check all .CN domain names for pornographic content and inaccurate records, says an IDG report.This will be quite an onerous task for 600 people given there are close to 14 million .CN domain names registered.CNNIC (China Internet Network Information Center), the .CN registry, has “previously announced its cleanup of .CN domains, but the scale of its hiring is a reminder that the center must bow to directives from the country’s authoritarian government. While lax regulation in China has been partly blamed for malicious activity on .CN domains, the government’s crackdown has focused on porn more than Web security,” says the IDG report.”As with so many cleanups in China, there is a very legitimate crime-fighting and law enforcement side of this,” said Rebecca MacKinnon, a visiting fellow at Princeton University’s Center for Information Technology Policy, in an e-mail to IDG. “But the flip side is that it also provides a very handy excuse to tighten controls on political and dissenting speech at the same time.”To read this IDG report in full, see:
www.pcworld.com/article/189088/.html
www.computerworld.com/s/article/9155358/China_s_.cn_cleanup_shows_politics_behind_Web_rules
www.networkworld.com/news/2010/021110-chinas-cn-cleanup-shows-politics.html