Tag Archives: Canadian Internet Registration Authority

CIRA Warns Of Online Scam For Fake Domain Renewal Notices

CIRA dotCA logo[news release] The Canadian Internet Registration Authority (CIRA) has received reports of an online scam, wherein “renewdomain.ca” is sending out fake email renewal notices to .CA Registrants.

“Renewdomain.ca” is not a CIRA Certified Registrar and is fraudulently posing as the Registrant’s Registrar in an attempt to obtain payment from the Registrant. The email identifies the recipient’s domain name and that it is about to expire. The recipient is then directed to renew the domain by clicking on a link that leads to a “renewdomain.ca” PayPal payment page.
CIRA has worked with the offending website’s hosting company, who took the site down. Anyone believing they have been a victim of this scam is encouraged to contact Paypal directly to dispute the transaction as quickly as possible.

All .CA Registrants should ignore these emails and not provide payment. If you have concerns about your domain name expiry date, contact your CIRA Certified Registrar directly.

This CIRA news release was sourced from:
www.cira.ca/news/announcements/online-scam/

Half Of New gTLDs Will Fail: CIRA CEO

Half of all new gTLDs, at least the ones that are open to registrations from the public, will fail, said the CEO of the Canadian Internet Registration Authority (CIRA), Byron Holland, in an interview with the Canadian IT Business. In addition, Holland believes that the introduction of the new gTLDs will create competition for ccTLDs such as .CA.”It’s going to dramatically impact the Canadian domain space one way or the other,” Holland told IT Business. “We assume if you add 500 or 1,000 new TLDs to the Internet landscape, we will definitely be up against a more competitive environment.”ICANN’s governance model to allow private stakeholders to control the new domains is the right approach, Holland said. Some critics would have preferred a treaty-based system run by national governments, possibly organised by the United Nations. But less government regulation and a more free market approach should lead to more rapid expansion of the internet, Holland went on to tell IT Business. Even if that does mean that for the first time in the Internet’s history, consumers will see TLDs fail.”Just like any other private business starting up, all these new TLDs will have a 50 per cent chance of going out of business in two or three years,” Holland says. “That’s going to be somewhat disquieting to people.”The full IT Business report is available at www.itbusiness.ca/it/client/en/home/News.asp?id=67442.

CIRA participates in development of online DNSChanger Malware Checker for Canadians

CIRA dotCA logo[news release] The Canadian Internet Registration Authority (CIRA), in collaboration with Public Safety Canada and the Canadian Radio-television Telecommunications Commission (CRTC), has developed an online DNS Checker to screen users’ computers for the DNSChanger malware.

Recently, through Operation Ghost Click, the FBI uncovered an extensive cyber criminal activity, whereas millions of computers around the world were infected with malicious software without the knowledge of the user. The malware, called DNSChanger, affected the Domain Name System (DNS) configuration of the user’s computer system. The DNS is the system that changes domain names into Internet Protocol (IP) addresses (for example, cira.ca=192.228.29.1. For more on how the DNS works you can visit youtu.be/2ZUxoi7YNgs). The malware infrastructure, which affected over 20,000 Canadian IP addresses, redirected unsuspecting user’s to rogue DNS servers, allowing the cyber criminals to manipulate the user’s web activity. Because of the complexity and sophistication of this malware, detection and removal is challenging without the help of an IT security professional.

Due to its experience in managing the DNS in Canada, CIRA was approached by Public Safety Canada to assist in developing a tool that allows Canadian Internet users to detect if their computer is affected by the DNSChanger malware.

The result of this collaboration with the Canadian Cyber Incident Response Centre (CCIRC) at Public Safety Canada and the CRTC is the DNSChanger Malware Checker, located at http://DNS-OK.ca/.

Once the user agrees to the Terms and Conditions, the DNS Checker will match the DNS Internet Protocol (IP) address employed by the user’s computer against the known Operation Ghost Click IP addresses. When completed, the user is greeted by either a green banner, which indicates that their computer is not infected with the malware, or a red banner, which indicates that their computer system may be infected with the malware. If the banner is red, the user is encouraged to consult the Public Safety Canada website that provides further information on detection and removal of the DNSChanger malware. For more information please visit www.publicsafety.gc.ca/prg/em/ccirc/2011/in11-002-eng.aspx.

“This type of initiative really speaks to the collaborative nature of the Canadian Internet community, and the key role CIRA plays,” said CIRA’s president and CEO Byron Holland. “CIRA is committed to providing Canadian Internet users with a safe, secure and trusted online experience and this DNS Checker provides an important resource for Canadians to screen their computer for the DNSChanger malware”.

The DNSChanger Malware Checker does not screen for any other virus, malicious code or malware.

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About CIRA
The Canadian Internet Registration Authority is the member-driven organization that manages Canada’s .CA domain name registry, develops and implements policies that support Canada’s Internet community, and represents the .CA registry internationally.

This CIRA news release was sourced from:
www.cira.ca/news/news-releases/dnschanger-checker/

America Registry logoTo register your .CA domain name, check America Registry here.

CIRA Moves Towards DNSSEC With Paper on Proposal For Way Forward

CIRA dotCA logo[news release] Today, the Canadian Internet Registration Authority (CIRA) took a critical step in making the Internet more secure for Canadians. As part of CIRA’s planned implementation of Domain Name System Security Extensions (DNSSEC), CIRA released a DNSSEC Practice Statement (DPS) to provide this service to the Canadian Internet community.

The DPS provides an operational outline of all the details on how CIRA plans to develop, maintain and manage DNSSEC deployment. CIRA is inviting comments on its DPS. Interested parties can send their feedback on the DPS to cira_dnssec@cira.ca.

“CIRA is committed to providing Canadian Internet users with a safe, secure and trusted online experience,” said CIRA’s President and CEO Byron Holland. “DNSSEC is the next logical step in securing DNS services and protecting Canadians online.”

DNSSEC is an important set of extensions that provide an extra layer of security to the domain name system (DNS), the system the Internet uses to translate your domain name from its commonly used URL into its numerical Internet protocol address.

In addition to the DPS, CIRA also launched an online knowledge centre dedicated to DNSSEC, available at cira.ca/knowledge-centre/technology/dnssec. The knowledge centre includes resources for Canadians to learn about why DNSSEC is important and how CIRA plans to implement it.

At its core, DNSSEC is a set of Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) specifications for adding origin authentication and data integrity to the DNS and is implemented through public key cryptography into the DNS hierarchy. What results is a more secure connection for the end user.

This CIRA news release was sourced from:
www.cira.ca/news/news-releases/internet-security/

America Registry logoTo register your .CA domain name, check out America Registry here.

CIRA Report Finds Internet Infrastructure, Digital Literacy and Economic Development Key to Canada's Future

CIRA logoThe Canadian Internet Registration Authority (CIRA) released a report on the findings from its national consultation on how the Internet is run. The report found that it was important for Canada to develop world class internet infrastructure and that the linkages between the development and deployment of the internet, along with economic development and digital literacy are major issues of public interest in Canada. Continue reading CIRA Report Finds Internet Infrastructure, Digital Literacy and Economic Development Key to Canada's Future

CIRA Report Finds Internet Infrastructure, Digital Literacy and Economic Development Key to Canada’s Future

The Canadian Internet Registration Authority (CIRA) released a report on the findings from its national consultation on how the Internet is run. The report found that it was important for Canada to develop world class internet infrastructure and that the linkages between the development and deployment of the internet, along with economic development and digital literacy are major issues of public interest in Canada.The report judged the Canadian Internet Forum a success, meeting its objectives and demonstrating that value that can be added to internet governance processes by a public forum that provides a space where internet stakeholders can meet to discuss and debate the public interest in the Internet outside the confines of established institutional structures, with the aim of building consensus on key issues as an input to decision-making in the public, private and not-for-profit sectors.The Forum was a national consultation hosted by CIRA, the manager of Canada’s .CA domain name registry, along with its partners the International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) and the Media Awareness Network (MNet). It consisted of face-to-face consultations that took place across Canada along with input received from an online discussion forum, and culminated at a national event held in Ottawa and webcast across the country in February 2011.The consultations were broadly themed under two topics: the digital economy and digital literacy, and Canadians identified numerous issues that are important to them. These issues included online safety and security, the development of a ‘Canadian vision’ for the Internet and the cost and speed of broadband.The report said that “unlike the centrally managed and regulated telecommunications and broadcasting networks that preceded it, the Internet was built bottom-up as an open network of networks, designed to maximise opportunities for users to access, create and exchange information and minimise controls on their activities.CIRA President and CEO Byron Holland suggested in the report “that as the complexity of internet governance increases, there a need for a public forum that engages all stakeholders and provides a comprehensive, balanced view of the public interest in the development and use of the internet as an input to government policy-makers and regulators, other public authorities, and decision-makers throughout Canada’s economy and society.”Holland warned that centralised, top-down control of the internet — the alternative to maintaining and enhancing the distributed, bottom-up, consensus-driven internet governance model so that it is able to cope with increasing complexity risks sub-optimising the role the Internet can play in Canada’s future.”The raising of digital literacy and economic development were two key messages found by participants, and that these were tightly interconnected, and that the public discourse surrounding them needs to be reframed and rebalanced to put greater emphasis on digital literacy — a task for which a public forum like the Forum is well-suited.”The report also found that in addition to recognising the close connections between economic development and digital literacy, the [Forum] process identified a number of fundamental internet governance challenges that must be addressed to enable the creation of a virtuous circle between them. These challenges include:

  • Achieving universal and affordable access to world-class internet infrastructure and services.
  • Equipping Canadians with the knowledge and skills they need to participate and prosper in the digital economy and global information society.
  • Ensuring a stable and secure online environment for individuals and organisations in the private and public sectors, through effective management of critical internet resources and protecting the privacy and other rights of Internet users.
  • Promoting Internet-enabled innovation in business, government, education, and health care.
  • Promoting digital inclusion of all communities and segments of the Canadian population.

To achieve all this, the Forum found that access to affordable world-class internet infrastructure and services in all areas of Canada would be required, something that is being addressed by all levels of government within Canada even though services available to Canadians lag behind those in some other countries.The report will be presented to the United Nations coordinated Internet Governance Forum (www.intgovforum.org), a venue for nations to discuss the future of the Internet.The report is available to download in full at www.scribd.com/doc/54601955.

CIRA to host national event on the future of Canada's Internet

CIRA logo[news release] On February 25, 2011, the Canadian Internet Registration Authority (CIRA) will present the findings from a national consultation on how the Internet is run at a public event in Ottawa. Continue reading CIRA to host national event on the future of Canada's Internet

CIRA to host national event on the future of Canada’s Internet

CIRA logo[news release] On February 25, 2011, the Canadian Internet Registration Authority (CIRA) will present the findings from a national consultation on how the Internet is run at a public event in Ottawa.

At the Canadian Internet Forum (CIF), CIRA, along with its partners, the International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) and the Media Awareness Network (MNet), will present findings from six face-to-face consultations that took place across Canada along with input received from an online discussion forum.

A panel of Canadian experts will discuss the findings, and leading Canadian technology visionary Leonard Brody will provide the keynote address. The event will also feature sessions for participants to provide their feedback and ideas about Internet governance in Canada and internationally. The CIF will be webcast to facilitate the interactive participation of all Canadians who are interested in Canada’s role in Internet governance.

Although the Internet has become an integral part of the Canadian economy and society, the CIF presents the first opportunity for Canadians to discuss how it is developed, deployed and governed. The results of the consultations, online discussion and the national event will be presented to the United Nations coordinated Internet Governance Forum, a venue for nations to discuss the future of the Internet.

As of January 25, 2011, the online discussion forum is open to all interested Canadians who wish to discuss issues related to how the Internet is developed, deployed and governed in Canada and around the world. All interested Canadians are invited to join the discussion at cif.cira.ca.

The agenda for the CIF is available here: cif.cira.ca/2011/01/cif-national-event-agenda/. Event details are as follows:

Time and date: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., February 25, 2011

Location: Brookstreet Hotel, Ottawa, ON

Registration is free and the event will also be webcast in English and French. Details on the webcast are available here: cif.cira.ca/cif-webcast-system-requirements/.

Please visit cif.cira.ca for updates on the CIF.

About CIRA

The Canadian Internet Registration Authority (CIRA) is the organization that manages Canada’s .CA domain name registry, develops and implements policies that support Canada’s Internet community and represents the .CA registry internationally.