Survey: Most Americans take breaks from Facebook

Facebook follows you everywhere. It’s on phones and computers, at work and home, and in the news. So it’s understandable that people might need a little rest from the social network.New research suggests that Facebook fatigue may be setting in with some users. Twenty-seven percent of Facebook users surveyed in the U.S. plan to spend less time on the site in 2013, compared with only 3% who plan to spend more time, according to a study from the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project.
http://edition.cnn.com/2013/02/05/tech/social-media/facebook-breaks-pew/index.htmlAlso see:Most Facebook Users Have Taken a Break From the Site, Study Finds
Facebook is the most popular social network in America — roughly two-thirds of adults in the country use it on a regular basis.But that doesn’t mean they don’t get sick of it.A new study released on Tuesday by the Pew Research Center’s Internet and American Life Project found that 61 percent of current Facebook users admitted that they had voluntarily taken breaks from the site, for as many as several weeks at a time.
http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/02/05/most-facebookers-have-taken-a-break-from-the-site-study-finds/Facebook: two thirds of users log off for weeks at a time
Two thirds of Facebook users have taken a voluntary break from the site for several weeks or more, citing reasons ranging from “excessive gossip or drama from their friends” to “concerns about privacy”, according to new research.But much as its critics might like to think otherwise, the world’s most popular social network is showing no signs of losing its audience. The most common reason stated for taking a break is that users are too busy, following by “just wasn’t interested” and that it’s a “waste of time”.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2013/feb/05/facebook-two-thirds-users-log-offPew report shows some Facebook users dialing down usage [IDG]
Facebook makes it easy to connect with people online, but some of its users say they got burned out on the site or grew tired of their friends’ “drama,” a new survey shows.More than a quarter, or 28 percent, of those quizzed in a recent Pew Internet Project survey said Facebook has become less important to them than it was a year ago, with about the same proportion saying they expect to spend less time on the social network in 2013. More than a third of users said the amount of time they spend on the site has decreased over the past year.
http://www.computerworld.com.au/article/452877/pew_report_shows_some_facebook_users_dialing_down_usage/
http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9236522/Some_Facebook_users_dialing_back_usage_Pew_survey_says
http://www.networkworld.com/news/2013/020513-pew-report-shows-some-facebook-266430.htmlComing and Going on FacebookOverviewTwo-thirds of online American adults (67%) are Facebook users, making Facebook the dominant social networking site in this country. And new findings from the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project indicate there is considerable fluidity in the Facebook user population:

  • 61% of current Facebook users say that at one time or another in the past they have voluntarily taken a break from using Facebook for a period of several weeks or more.
  • 20% of the online adults who do not currently use Facebook say they once used the site but no longer do so.
  • 8% of online adults who do not currently use Facebook are interested in becoming Facebook users in the future.

We asked the 61% of Facebook users who have taken a break from using the site to tell us in their own words why they did so, and they mentioned a variety of reasons. The largest group (21%) said that their “Facebook vacation” was a result of being too busy with other demands or not having time to spend on the site. Others pointed toward a general lack of interest in the site itself (10% mentioned this in one way or another), an absence of compelling content (10%), excessive gossip or “drama” from their friends (9%), or concerns that they were spending too much time on the site and needed to take a break (8%).About the SurveyThe PSRAI December 2012 Omnibus Week 2 obtained telephone interviews with a nationally representative sample of 1,006 adults living in the continental United States. Telephone interviews were conducted by landline (601) and cell phone (405, including 191 without a landline phone). The survey was conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International (PSRAI). Interviews were done in English by Princeton Data Source from December 13 to 16, 2012. Statistical results are weighted to correct known demographic discrepancies. The margin of sampling error for the complete set of weighted data is ± 3.6 percentage points.
http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2013/Coming-and-going-on-facebook.aspx

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.