Second RIAA piracy trial starts: Defense Tactics Include Feng Shui and Legalized Pot

The Recording Industry Association of America may have decided not to pursue further file-sharing trials as a policy, but one last case is set to get underway today and promises to bring a dash of the theatrical into the courtroom. Boston University doctoral student Joel Tennenbaum is being sued by the RIAA for sharing 30 songs through the Kazaa peer-to-peer filesharing application in 2004. Tennenbaum could receive a maximum of $4.5 million if he loses, but that overwhelming fine has not daunted the zealousness of his defense team.Tennenbaum is being defended by Harvard School of Law professor and Founder of the Berkman Center for Internet & Society, Charles Nesson who is being assisted by a “small group of passionate students” under the professor’s guidance. The team has created an informational Website called “Joel Fights Back” where you can find background on the case, and the defense team also plans on posting a blog at the site.
http://www.pcworld.com/article/169153/.html
http://pcworld.idg.com.au/article/312724/Also see:Music pirate’just a kid’ says download case lawyer [AP]
A Boston University graduate student was “a kid who did what kids do” when he swapped songs through file-sharing networks like Kazaa, his lawyer said on Tuesday as his copyright-infringement trial began.In only the second music-downloading case against an individual to go to trial, the major recording labels accuse Joel Tenenbaum, 25, of Providence, Rhode Island, of downloading and distributing songs from such bands as Green Day and Aerosmith. The case centers on 30 shared songs, though the recording companies say he distributed many more than that.
http://www.nzherald.co.nz/technology/news/article.cfm?c_id=5&objectid=10587346
http://www.stuff.co.nz/technology/2700400/

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