PlayStation Hackers May Have Stolen Data on 75 Million Users, Sony Says

Sony Corp. warned its 77 million PlayStation Network and Qriocity online service customers that their credit-card data, billing addresses and other personal information may have been stolen by a hacker.”While there is no evidence at this time that credit-card data was taken, we cannot rule out the possibility,” Patrick Seybold, a Sony spokesman, said on the company blog page. The hacker obtained user-provided names, e-mail addresses, birth dates, log-in information and purchase history, Seybold said.
www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-04-26/sony-says-network-hackers-may-have-stolen-users-personal-data.htmlAlso see:Sony Says PlayStation Hacker Got Personal Data
Christopher Miller’s PlayStation Portable game console had been broken for most of two years. So when his parents got him a new one for his 25th birthday on April 18, he was elated — but only briefly.Last week, Sony’s online network for the PlayStation suffered a catastrophic failure through a hacking attack. And since then, the roughly 77 million gamers worldwide like Mr. Miller who have accounts for the service have been unable to play games with friends through the Internet or to download demos of new games.
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/27/technology/27playstation.htmlPlayStation Network hackers access data of 77 million users
Sony has warned that the names, addresses and other personal data of about 77 million people with accounts on its PlayStation Network (PSN) have been stolen.Gamers have been locked out of the network for a week, but the company has revealed that the system has been suspended since it was hacked last Wednesday.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2011/apr/26/playstation-network-hackers-dataHacker Raids Sony Videogame Network
A hacker stole the names, birth dates and possibly credit-card numbers for 77 million people who play online videogames through Sony Corp.’s PlayStation console, in what could rank among the biggest data breaches in history.Sony, whose gaming network has been offline for six days, disclosed Tuesday that an “illegal and unauthorized intrusion” between April 17 and April 19 resulted in the loss of a significant amount of personal information that could be used in identity theft.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703778104576287362503776534.html

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