Pew study: US parents of teens online worry about ads, strangers

Parents are more worried about advertisers having access to their children’s online data than about their children talking to strangers online, according to a report published today.The Pew Internet Project and the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University collaborated on the report, which is based on a survey if 802 parents of children aged 12 to 17 with questions about social-networking sites, namely Facebook. As more and more teens and pre-teens use social media as a part of their every day communications , the study finds that parents worried about a variety of online dangers — it’s no longer just about warning your kids not to talk to strangers.
news.cnet.com/8301-1023_3-57552202-93/pew-study-parents-of-teens-online-worry-about-ads-strangers/Also see:Pew: U.S. Parents Of Online Teens Worried About Reputational Damage Of Online Activity And What Advertisers Know About Their Kids
While European legislators are considering adding a ‘right to be forgotten’ to data privacy laws to give Internet users some control over who owns their data, U.S. parents are worried about the reputational damage of their teens’ online activities and what advertisers are learning about them, according to a new report by the Pew Internet Project and the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University, called Parents, Teens and Online Privacy. The research found that many parents are also continuing to take steps to mitigate and monitor their children’s online activities.Chief among parents’ concerns about their online teens’ activities is the age-old worry about risks posed by strangers — 53 percent of parents said they are very concerned about their kids interacting with strangers online. But, more interestingly, almost half (49 percent) of surveyed parents said they are very concerned about “reputation management” on behalf of their kids and what they’re doing online. Forty-four percent of parents expressed the same level of concern about the impact on future academic or employment opportunities, and 46 percent flagged that high level of concern about how much information advertisers can learn about their kids’ online behaviour.
techcrunch.com/2012/11/20/pew-u-s-parents-of-online-teens-worried-about-reputational-damage-of-online-activity-and-what-advertisers-know-about-their-kids/Parents, Teens, and Online PrivacyOverviewMost parents of teenagers are concerned about what their teenage children do online and how their behavior could be monitored by others. Some parents are taking steps to observe, discuss, and check up on their children’s digital footprints, according to a new survey by the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project.

  • 81% of parents of online teens say they are concerned about how much information advertisers can learn about their child’s online behavior, with some 46% being “very” concerned.
  • 72% of parents of online teens are concerned about how their child interacts online with people they do not know, with some 53% of parents being “very” concerned.
  • 69% of parents of online teens are concerned about how their child’s online activity might affect their future academic or employment opportunities, with some 44% being “very” concerned about that.
  • 69% of parents of online teens are concerned about how their child manages his or her reputation online, with some 49% being “very” concerned about that.
  • Some of these expressions of concern are particularly acute for the parents of younger teens; 63% of parents of teens ages 12-13 say they are “very” concerned about their child’s interactions with people they do not know online and 57% say they are “very” concerned about how their child manages his or her reputation online.

About the SurveyThese findings are based on a nationally representative phone survey of 802 parents and their 802 teens ages 12-17. It was conducted between July 26 and September 30, 2012. Interviews were conducted in English and Spanish and on landline and cell phones. The margin of error for the full sample is ± 4.5 percentage points. In collaboration with the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard, this report also includes quotes gathered through a series of exploratory in-person focus group interviews about privacy and digital media, with a focus on social networking sites (in particular Facebook), conducted by the Berkman Center’s Youth and Media Project between May and December 2011. The team conducted 16 focus group interviews with roughly 120 students.
http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2012/Teens-and-Privacy.aspx

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