The problem in China isn’t with Google

The problem in China isn’t with Google
The uncomfortable truth is that the Chinese government is not progressing as fast towards democracy as a growth-hungry West has let itself believe, argues Tom Rotherham. … While one may well wish that the Chinese government recognised that free access to information is in its people’s interests, it is wrong-headed in the extreme to suggest that any company is doing the right thing by ignoring the government in a country in which it operates.
http://www.ethicalcorp.com/content.asp?ContentID=4081

China’s old guard warns censors of ‘social disaster’

China’s old guard warns censors of ‘social disaster’
A group of retired senior officials and academics, including Mao Zedong’s former secretary, yesterday called for more openness, warning China’s propaganda department that the media crackdown “could sow the seeds of disaster for political and social transition”.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/china/story/0,,1710025,00.html

us: Measuring Broadband’s Economic Impact by William H. Lehr, Carlos A. Osorio, Sharon E. Gillett (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)

Does broadband matter to the economy? Numerous studies have focused on whether there is a digital divide, on regulatory impacts and investment incentives, and on the factors influencing where broadband is available. However, given how recently broadband has been adopted, little empirical research has investigated its economic impact. This paper presents estimates of the effect of broadband on a number of indicators of economic activity, including employment, wages, and industry mix, using a cross-sectional panel data set of communities (by zip code) across the United States.

Yahoo! accused over jailing of Chinese dissident

Yahoo! accused over jailing of Chinese dissident (Guardian)Campaigners for free speech in China accused the US internet company Yahoo! of providing information that allowed Chinese police to jail a cyber-dissident two years ago. The charge by Reporters Without Borders is likely to provide further ammunition to US congressional members, less than two weeks after Google said it would bend to Beijing’s wish to censor politically sensitive content.http://technology.guardian.co.uk/news/story/0,,1706736,00.html