Net Neutrality Ruling: What are the FCC’s Options? What the Key Passages Mean

While striking down federal rules mandating equal treatment of Internet traffic, a three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit left the Federal Communications Commission with some some wiggle room to regulate Internet providers.It said two specific rules imposed by the FCC’s “open Internet order” exceed the agency’s authority under current law. But notably, the appeals court didn’t declare the whole concept of net neutrality unlawful, nor did it say the FCC couldn’t regulate broadband providers.
http://blogs.wsj.com/digits/2014/01/14/net-neutrality-ruling-what-are-the-fccs-options/Also see:Net Neutrality Ruling: What the Key Passages Mean
The FCC’s open Internet rules were struck down by a federal appeals court Tuesday, dealing a major blow to the idea of “net neutrality” and opening the door for companies like Verizon to start charging content providers more money for faster speeds. Netflix, for example, swallows up huge chunks of bandwidth as its customers stream video. FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler said the FCC would consider appealing to the Supreme Court.Here is a PDF of the ruling, which runs more than 60 pages long. We’ve pulled out a few key passages, which explain the court’s thinking:
http://blogs.wsj.com/digits/2014/01/14/net-neutrality-ruling-what-the-key-passages-mean/

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