Major Source of Online Scams and Spams Knocked Offline

A U.S. based Web hosting firm that security experts say was responsible for facilitating more than 75 percent of the junk e-mail blasted out each day globally has been knocked offline following reports from Security Fix on evidence gathered about criminal activity emanating from the network.For the past four months, Security Fix has been gathering data from the security industry about McColo Corp., a San Jose, Calif., based Web hosting service whose client list experts say includes some of the most disreputable cyber-criminal gangs in business today.
http://voices.washingtonpost.com/securityfix/2008/11/major_source_of_online_scams_a.htmlHost of Internet Spam Groups is Cut Off
The volume of junk e-mail sent worldwide dropped drastically today after a Web hosting firm identified by the computer security community as a major host of organizations allegedy engaged in spam activity was taken offline, according to security firms that monitor spam distribution online.While its gleaming, state-of-the-art, 30-story office tower in downtown San Jose, Calif., hardly looks like the staging ground for what could be called a full-scale cyber crime offensive, security experts have found that a relatively small firm at that location is home to servers that serve as a gateway for a significant portion of the world’s junk e-mail.
www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/11/12/AR2008111200658.htmlSpam Volumes Drop by Two-Thirds After Firm Goes Offline
The volume of junk e-mail sent worldwide plummeted on Tuesday after a Web hosting firm identified by the computer security community as a major host of organizations engaged in spam activity was taken offline.Experts say the precipitous drop-off in spam comes from Internet providers unplugging McColo Corp., a hosting provider in Northern California that was the home base for machines responsible for coordinating the sending of roughly 75 percent of all spam each day.
voices.washingtonpost.com/securityfix/2008/11/spam_volumes_drop_by_23_after.htmlSpam Volume Drops When ISPs Terminate McColo
If you notice a bit less spam in your inbox this week, thank Brian Krebs, who covers security for The Washington Post.After four months of gathering information from various security companies about the malicious traffic coming out of McColo Corp., a San Jose, Calif.-based Web hosting company, Krebs took his findings up the data chain and presented them to the company’s ISPs, Global Crossing and Hurricane Electric.
www.informationweek.com/news/security/client/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=212002194

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