Articles by date

23 March 2007

uk: Bullies use iPods and networking sites to wage hi-tech campaigns (The Independent)

Playground bullies are deploying iPods and social networking sites such as MySpace and MSN Messenger to wage increasingly hi-tech campaigns against victims, according to new research.

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Battle brews over the .nu domain (PC World)

PC World in New Zealand discusses a dispute between the Niue government and William Semich who applied for and obtained the rights to operate the .nu ccTLD. Niue's government say its domain was stolen with Niue's travelling ambassador of Niue describing the process as "digital colonialism. The domain is not used by our nation, and it hasn't given us anything, except for an internet connection. Also, Niue gets the blame for all the bad things done from .nu domains." Back in 1997 the Niue government was told "that the internet was nothing to bother about". And on top of this, "nu" means "now" in Sweden leading to the ccTLD being popular there. So now Niue wants their ccTLD back viewing it as a valuable source of income that would lead to "Better schools, better health care, better infrastructure and improvements in tourism. That's what it would bring - economic independence. To us, this is a huge issue."

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How to Reduce the Pain of Switching Domains (Internet Search Engine Database)

Transferring traffic and popularity to a new domain is a painstaking process that no one on the web appears to be immune to, or so Topix.net has realized. Topix.net is a leading news aggregation resource that has been in the news lately because they are planning to move their site from Topix.net to Topix.com after purchasing the .com for a cool million from a Canadian animation company.

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Google's privacy policy is clearer, not tougher (International Herald Tribune)

The change Google announced last week in its privacy policy was not to protect your searches but to make clearer how long they will be recorded.

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Swedish Internet surveillance law stalled (Computer World)

The Swedish Social Democratic Party said Monday that it will block a bill authorizing extensive surveillance of e-mail and other Internet communications.

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UK regulators 'relaxed' on net neutrality (ZDNet)

Ofcom and the Department for Trade and Industry argue against net neutrality legislation as the debate reaches Westminster

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American Studios' Secret Plan to Lock down European TV Devices (Internet Business Law Services)

An international consortium of television and technology companies is devising draconian anti-consumer restrictions for the next generation of TVs in Europe and beyond, at the behest of American entertainment giants. The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) is the only public interest group to have gained entrance into the secretive meetings of the Digital Video Broadcasting Project (DVB), a group that creates the television and video specifications used in Europe, Australia, and much of Asia and Africa. In a report released today, EFF shows how U.S. movie and television companies have convinced DVB to create new technical specifications that would build digital rights management technologies into televisions. These specifications are likely to take away consumers' rights, which will subsequently be sold back to them piecemeal -- so entertainment fans will have to pay again and again for legitimate uses of lawfully acquired digital television content.

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Can filesharers be made to pay? (The Guardian)

The music industry is beginning to understand that lawsuits don't deter pirates and that it must find ways to make money from P2P sharing

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The fat lady is clearing her throat and getting ready to sing for Opera (The Guardian)

Two months ago I stopped using Opera - the smallest, once the fastest, and often the best browser ever built. Opera had all the good ideas years before everyone else. It had tabbed browsing in 1997, and proper CSS support in the same year, long before there was any proper CSS to decode. Early this century it had a tiny chat client built in that would work across all the main networks. The Opera email client worked the same magic as Gmail, sorting and searching the mail without you needing to do so yourself, but more quickly, and it worked offline as well; its junk filter is very nearly as good Gmail's, and much better than Thunderbird's.

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us: Appeals court: VoIP to stay free of state regulation (ARS Technica)

The FCC's decision to exempt VoIP services from most state regulation was upheld today by a federal appeals court -- good news for VoIP operators like Vonage but a disappointment to states that want to exert greater control over the technology.

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Laptops set to out sell desktops (BBC)

Laptops will overtake desktop PCs as the dominant form of computer in 2011, according to a report by analysts IDC.

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22 March 2007

MySpace Restrictions Upset Some Users (New York Times)

Some users of MySpace feel as if their space is being invaded. MySpace, the Web's largest social network, has gradually been imposing limits on the software tools that users can embed in their pages, like music and video players that also deliver advertising or enable transactions. At stake is the ability of MySpace, which is owned by the News Corporation, to ensure that it alone can commercially capitalize on its 90 million visitors each month.

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Privacy for Internet names moves forward (Sydney Morning Herald)

Associated Press have a widely published story on the proposed Whois changes that begins "Many owners of Internet addresses face this quandary: Provide your real contact information when you register a domain name and subject yourself to junk or harassment. Or enter fake data and risk losing it outright." It notes that this may be about to change with the Task Force on Whois policy recommendations that "endorsed a proposal that would give more privacy options to small businesses, individuals with personal Web sites and other domain name owners." The article notes discussion will take place on the recommendations in Lisbon, but that "Resolution ... could take several more months or even years, with crucial details on implementation still unsettled and a vocal minority backing an alternative." The article notes back when the addressing system was developed in the 1980s privacy of Whois information wasn't a consideration as "government and university researchers who dominated the Internet knew one another and didn't mind sharing personal details to resolve technical problems."

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Final Task Force Report on Whois Services (ICANN)

The Whois Task Force completed its work and sent its Final Task Force Report on Whois Services to the Generic Names Supporting Organization (GNSO) Council on 12 March, 2007. The report concludes the task force phase of the GNSO policy development process (PDP) on Whois, and sets out the key findings of the Whois Task Force, since it was convened in February 2005 and began work on its terms of reference. The GNSO Council will now consider the Task Force Report and deliberate on making a policy recommendation to the ICANN Board.

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.INFO now supports over 1 million dedicated Web sites after passing 5 year anniversary (Afilias)

Afilias announced that the .INFO gTLD has reached over 4 million domain names under management, just months after crossing its fifth anniversary of real time registrations available to the public. The four millionth name was registered in the United Kingdom by the registrar MelbourneIT.

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Judge tosses out Google PageRank lawsuit (Sydney Morning Herald)

A US judge has thrown out a lawsuit challenging the fairness of how web search leader Google calculates the popularity of websites in determining search results, court papers show.

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Google joins Apple in race to launch mobiles in Europe (The Guardian)

Several leading European mobile phone companies are being courted by Apple and Google as the American technology giants look to bring their own mobile phones to European consumers.

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Virtual worlds are 'worth $1bn' (BBC)

Millions of people are flocking to inhabit virtual online worlds, says research by analysts Screen Digest.

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21 March 2007

How to Get Started as a Domainer: 28 Tips, Techniques and Resources (Aviva)

How does a salary of $10,000 per day sound to you? Aviva have a guide to earning a living from domain names, suggesting that you to could be like webmaster and marketing extraordinaire Marcus Frind who reportedly pulls in $10,000 per day in Google AdSense from his dating website PlentyofFish.com. However that's nothing compared to the $100,000 per day domainer Yun Ye was pulling in before he sold his domain portfolio for about $164M in 2004 and subsequently disappeared under the radar. The guide suggests domaining is a lot like stock investing, the very best in the field have moved beyond basic strategies and have developed their own specific formulas for success. They discuss Trademark Typo Domains, Keyword Typo Domains, Automated Volume Buying, Trendwatching, Brute Force using Automated Domain Research Tools, how to financing your domaining, Important Practices such as don't fall in love with a domain name, Techniques for Monetizing and Tools for the Trade such as automation and resource tools.

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Digital lock's rights and wrongs (BBC)

In the 80s, according to record companies, home taping was killing music. Fast forward some 20 years and the devices we use to listen to music may have changed, but the recording industry is still claiming that the illegal copying of their product harms future production.

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Surge' in hijacked PC networks (BBC)

The number of computers hijacked by malicious hackers to send out spam and viruses has grown almost 30% in the last year, with more than six million computers world wide now part of a "bot network", according to a survey by Symantec.

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uk: The Digital Age (Office of National Statistics)

We live in an increasingly connected society, with the rapid advance of ICT in business and in the home. But by no means has everyone joined in the digital age. There is a clear divide between small and large businesses, while in the home, ICT ownership and use is closely linked to household income. Focus On the Digital Age gives an overview of ICT use in the UK, showing the extent to which people, education, business and government have taken up the new technology and how ICT is changing working and business practices. It also looks at how the UK compares with other countries and describes some of the problems associated with the digital age.

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Use of ICT at Home: over half of homes have a computer (Office of National Statistics)

Digital technology is relatively new, yet it is already approaching the near universal ownership levels of older technologies. In January to April 2006, 56 per cent of households in Great Britain had a desktop computer, 30 per cent had a portable or laptop computer, and 7 per cent had a handheld computer. During this period, 87 per cent of people aged 16 to 30 had used a computer in the previous three months compared with 45 per cent of those aged 50 and over.

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ONS report reveals digital divide in the UK (E-Consultancy.com)

The latest Focus on the Digital Age report from the Office for National Statistics reveals that, while internet use is well established and growing fast, the 'digital divide' remains a problem.

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20 March 2007

Beyond Internet Governance: The Emerging International Framework for Governing the Networked World by Mary Rundle (Berkman Center for Internet & Society, Harvard law School)

ABSTRACT: Increasingly, governments are regulating the "Net" - that is, the Internet and people's activities over it. Because the Net is global in nature, governments are turning to intergovernmental organizations to iron out common approaches. Taken together, these international Net initiatives foray into all areas of government traditionally dealt with by domestic regimes - addressing foreign commercial relations, jurisdiction, infrastructure, security, monetary authority, property, relations between private parties, and citizenship. In agreeing to participate in these federated, power-sharing arrangements, governments are gradually constructing an entire framework for governing the networked world. Given the importance of these rules for the future, those who hold freedom dear must work to build democratic values into this emerging international system.

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