Google names names on copyright takedowns; Microsoft is #1

Who complains loudest about Google linking to infringing content in its search results? The movie and music industries, of course, who absolutely delight in taking whacks at the search engine. But thanks to a huge new trove of data released today by Google, we know that the worldwide top takedown requestor — by far — is actually Microsoft.If content owners claim that a Google search result links to infringing material, Google will remove the link. But just how many times does this happen — and who is making all the requests? Google today rolled out an upgrade to its “Transparency Report” that shows private copyright takedown information in addition to the usual government requests for user information or for censorship.
http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2012/05/google-names-names-on-copyright-takedowns-microsoft-is-1/Also see:Google’s copyright complaints flag up piracy of Microsoft
Microsoft has asked Google to remove more than 500,000 links from its index in the last month, figures show.The vast majority of the links in question were ones which took people to sites connecting to pirated Microsoft software.Google shared the statistics as part of its efforts to be more transparent about what influences search results.
http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-18204411Microsoft Copyright Violations Dominate Google’s Takedown Requests [AP]
Google’s Internet search engine receives more complaints about websites believed to be infringing on Microsoft’s copyrights than it does about material produced by entertainment companies pushing for tougher laws against online piracy.A snapshot of Microsoft’s apparently rampant copyright headaches emerged in new data that Google released Thursday to provide a better understanding of the intellectual property abuses on the Internet.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/05/24/microsoft-copyright-google_n_1543584.html
http://news.theage.com.au/breaking-news-technology/new-google-data-show-microsofts-piracy-problems-20120525-1z8b9.html
http://news.smh.com.au/breaking-news-technology/new-google-data-show-microsofts-piracy-problems-20120525-1z8b9.htmlGoogle Removes 1 Million Infringing Links Monthly
Each month, Google removes more than 1 million links to infringing content such as movies, video games, music and software from its search results — with about half of those requests for removal last month coming from Microsoft.The search and advertising giant revealed the data Thursday as it released sortable analytics on the massive number of copyright takedown requests it receives — adding to its already existing data on the number of times governments ask for users’ personal data.
http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2012/05/google-infringing-link-removal/Transparency for copyright removals in search
We believe that openness is crucial for the future of the Internet. When something gets in the way of the free flow of information, we believe there should be transparency around what that block might be.So two years ago we launched the Transparency Report, showing when and what information is accessible on Google services around the world. We started off by sharing data about the government requests we receive to remove content from our services or for information about our users. Then we began showing traffic patterns to our services, highlighting when they’ve been disrupted.Today we’re expanding the Transparency Report with a new section on copyright. Specifically, we’re disclosing the number of requests we get from copyright owners (and the organizations that represent them) to remove Google Search results because they allegedly link to infringing content. We’re starting with search because we remove more results in response to copyright removal notices than for any other reason. So we’re providing information about who sends us copyright removal notices, how often, on behalf of which copyright owners and for which websites. As policymakers and Internet users around the world consider the pros and cons of different proposals to address the problem of online copyright infringement, we hope this data will contribute to the discussion.For this launch we’re disclosing data dating from July 2011, and moving forward we plan on updating the numbers each day. As you can see from the report, the number of requests has been increasing rapidly. These days it’s not unusual for us to receive more than 250,000 requests each week, which is more than what copyright owners asked us to remove in all of 2009. In the past month alone, we received about 1.2 million requests made on behalf of more than 1,000 copyright owners to remove search results. These requests targeted some 24,000 different websites.
http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2012/05/transparency-for-copyright-removals-in.html

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