France convicts first person under anti-piracy law (even though he didn’t do it)

A 40-year-old Frenchman living in rural eastern France has become the first person ordered to pay a fine under France’s controversial anti-piracy three-strikes law known as Hadopi.On Thursday, a judge ruled that Alain Prevost must pay €150 ($194) for failing to secure his Internet (presumably WiFi) connection and for ignoring the three warnings sent by the Hadopi agency. He has become the first person to be convicted under Hadopi; his is the first of 14 cases brought against French Internet users who reach the third strike.
http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2012/09/france-convicts-first-person-under-anti-piracy-law-even-though-he-didnt-do-it/Also see:French Anti-Piracy Law Claims First Victim, Convicted of Failing to Secure His Internet Connection
According to news reports published earlier today, the French anti-piracy law has claimed its first victim. The individual, described by TorrentFreak as a “craftsman from a small village in eastern France,” was convicted of allowing his WiFi connection to be used to download songs without obtaining prior permission from the copyright owners. Under the three-strikes law in France, known as Hadopi1 this could leave the man liable for up to a 1,500 euro fine. He could also have his Internet connection shut off while still being forced to continue to pay for the connection (the so-called “double pain”). The court found the man guilty, settling on a 150 euro fine. Thankfully, the court declined to suspend his Internet connection. While we were heartened that the individual’s Internet connection was not suspended, EFF condemns the ongoing application of Hadopi, which along with similar copyright legislation threatens our rights to access and publish content freely online. This ruling serves as further evidence that such three-strikes laws must be repealed.
https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2012/09/french-anti-piracy-law-claims-first-victim-convicted-failing-secure-his-internetFrance sees first conviction under new antipiracy law
France has assessed its first fine under the antipiracy law known as Hadopi.Alain Prevost must pay the equivalent of $194 after being found liable for failing to secure his Internet connection and for ignoring warnings that the connection was being used to illegally download copyrighted content, according to a report in Ars Technica.
http://news.cnet.com/8301-1023_3-57512506-93/france-sees-first-conviction-under-new-antipiracy-law/French court levies first fine under three-strikes law on illegal downloads under Hadopi [IDG]
A French court fined a man €150 (US$193) on Thursday for failing to secure his Internet connection, according to a spokesman for the French High Authority for the Distribution of Works and the Protection of Rights on the Internet (Hadopi).Hadopi’s Commission for Rights Protection, the body that investigates reports of copyright infringement, has passed just 14 case files to the courts for prosecution under the country’s controversial three strikes law since it began its work in October 2010. This is the first of the cases to reach trial.
www.computerworld.com/s/article/9231255/French_court_levies_first_fine_under_three_strikes_law_on_illegal_downloads_under_Hadopi
http://www.networkworld.com/news/2012/091312-french-court-levies-first-fine-262439.html
www.pcworld.com/businesscenter/article/262285/french_court_levies_first_fine_under_threestrikes_law_on_illegal_downloads.htmlPirated Rihanna songs land Frenchman in court
The first person has been fined under France’s new anti-piracy law.Alain Prevost was fined €150 (£121) for pirating two Rihanna tracks even though his wife admitted she downloaded the songs.The fine was levied on the 40-year-old because he paid for the web link over which the songs were downloaded.The French government agency policing downloading in the country is preparing cases against 14 other people it suspects of pirating movies and music.
http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-19597429

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.