For Some, Move To Windows 7 Will Be Tough; While Microsoft Profits Slump

On October 22, Microsoft will finally release a new version of Windows that will be as good as the deeply disappointing Windows Vista should have been when it came out in January 2007. The new edition, called Windows 7, is a big improvement over both Vista and the sturdy, 2001-vintage Windows XP still widely in use. It will give Apple’s long-superior Mac OS X operating system a run for its money (though Apple might maintain its edge with a new version, called Snow Leopard, due in September).But how will Windows users transition their current computers to the new Windows 7? While this latest operating system stresses simplicity, the upgrade process will be anything but simple for the huge base of average consumers still using XP, who likely outnumber Vista users. It will be frustrating, tedious and labor-intensive.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970204900904574304283334746634.htmlAlso see:Microsoft’s Revenue Falls 17%; PC Slump Continues
Microsoft has closed out perhaps its most difficult year as a public company in less than stellar fashion. On Thursday, the company significantly missed Wall Street’s fourth-quarter revenue target and reported the first decline in full-year revenue in its 34-year history.The company, the world’s largest software maker, posted net income of $3.05 billion, or 34 cents a share, for its fourth quarter, which ended June 30. That was down sharply from the $4.30 billion, or 46 cents a share, it earned in the fourth quarter a year ago. Excluding charges tied to legal matters, layoffs and investments, Microsoft earned 36 cents a share during the quarter, meeting the forecast of analysts surveyed by Thomson Reuters.
http://nytimes.com/2009/07/24/technology/companies/24soft.htmlMicrosoft Can’t Evade Downturn’s Tight Grip
Microsoft, the once-swaggering giant of the personal computer industry, has been humbled, both by the recession and by problems of its own making.On Thursday, the world’s largest software company reported its worst fiscal year since it initially sold stock to the public in 1986. Year-over-year revenue and full-year sales of Microsoft’s flagship Windows software dropped for the first time.
http://nytimes.com/2009/07/24/technology/companies/24soft.html

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