Category Archives: Government & Policy

us: Black arts of politics move into cyberspace

us: Black arts of politics move into cyberspace
Coming soon to a polling station near you — or at least a computer screen — may be some of the blackest and newest arts of American politics. The latest weapons in the campaign for control of Congress, known by names such as Google bombing and Wikipedia vandalism, have been deployed to varying effect in the US elections, which are more reliant than ever before on such techniques.
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,3-2429423,00.html

US Congress steps into cyberspace

US Congress steps into cyberspace
The BBC reports that “US politicians could soon be rubbing shoulders with orcs and night elves in World of Warcraft.” Further, the BBC says that it’s unlikely that in-game trading will be taxed and the Joint Economic Committee, who is conducting the investigation, has said the investigation was prompted by the “dramatic increase in the popularity of online gaming”.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/technology/6065534.stm

eu: Regulation without frontiers

eu: Regulation without frontiers
The EU’s proposed rules for internet video are out of tune with the times: TELEVISION used to be simple: you turned on, tuned in, and dropped off. Only a small handful of stations existed, because spectrum was scarce. In return for government licences, broadcasters were heavily regulated. But technology has changed everything. Cable and satellite deliver hundreds of channels; broadband links and sites such as YouTube allow anyone to distribute video to millions of people; and mobile phones will soon let people watch television anywhere. Everything has changed, in short, except the regulations. Europe’s attempt to update the rules, however, has become highly controversial.
http://economist.com/business/displaystory.cfm?story_id=8035887

us: Politics Get Caught in the Web

us: Politics Get Caught in the Web
In the quest for political office, modern campaigners deal in the currency of the moment, information. Information is power, and campaigns trade fiercely in it, exhaustively researching their opponents’ past, scrutinizing the moods of the elusive swing voter and spewing (or leaking) favorable information about their own candidate. Of course, politicians try to harness the power of the internet, but some campaigns look more like they are stumbling than steering through cyberspace. In the quest for political office, modern campaigners deal in the currency of the moment, information. Information is power, and campaigns trade fiercely in it, exhaustively researching their opponents’ past, scrutinizing the moods of the elusive swing voter and spewing (or leaking) favorable information about their own candidate. Of course, politicians try to harness the power of the internet, but some campaigns look more like they are stumbling than steering through cyberspace. The article also refers to a lawsuit alleging cybersquatting on a dozen domain names and asks “Why are so many campaigns tripping over the internet?” Campaigns are about collecting, controlling and disseminating information. The internet has a lot of rules about information transfer. These rules include complicated “unauthorized access” statutes, copyright law, trademark law and domain-name regulations.
http://wired.com/news/columns/0,71928-0.html

us/eu: U.S. Joins Council of Europe Convention on Computer-Based Crime

us/eu: U.S. Joins Council of Europe Convention on Computer-Based Crime
The United States is now a party to the Council of Europe (COE) Convention on Cybercrime, the only multilateral treaty that specifically addresses the problem of computer-related crime and electronic evidence gathering, the White House announced September 29.
http://usinfo.state.gov/xarchives/display.html?p=washfile-english&y=2006&m=September&x=20060929165524xlrennef8.465213e-02