Breakthrough US deal by Google to sell book content online

It took a multimillion dollar lawsuit, two years of tense negotiations, and an awful lot of scanning. But yesterday the publishing world stood on the threshold of a digital era after a US deal paved the way to transform publishing.The agreement between Google and the US book industry means that internet users will soon be able to choose from and buy millions of titles, many out of print, or read them on a page-by-page basis.
www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2008/oct/29/google-books-publishing-online-royaltiesGoogle settles suit over book-scanning project
Google said Tuesday that it had agreed to pay $125 million to settle two copyright lawsuits brought by book authors and publishers over the company’s plan to digitize and show snippets of in-copyright books and to share digital copies with libraries without the explicit permission.Under the settlement, which is subject to court approval, the money will be used to set up a book registry, resolve existing claims by authors and publishers and cover legal fees. Copyright holders will also be able to register their works and receive payment for book sales and use by individuals and for subscriptions by libraries. Revenue from those programs will be split between Google, the publishers and the authors.
http://nytimes.com/2008/10/29/technology/internet/29google.html
http://iht.com/articles/2008/10/28/technology/29google.phpGoogle Settles Publishers’ Lawsuit Over Book Offerings
Search engine giant Google yesterday announced that it had settled a pair of lawsuits that accused the company of copyright infringement, signaling a new chapter in how books could be read and purchased online.Google said it would pay $125 million to end a fight with the Association of American Publishers and the Authors Guild, which had filed lawsuits after Google began scanning millions of works to the Web four years ago.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/10/28/AR2008102803611.htmlGoogle reaches $125m copyright settlement
Google has agreed to pay $125 million to settle claims from publishers and writers over the internet company’s plans to scan millions of books.
http://business.timesonline.co.uk/tol/business/industry_sectors/technology/article5033697.eceGoogle Reaches $125 Million Settlement In Book Copyright Lawsuits
The deal with book publishers and authors would clear the way for Google Book Search to show digitized images of millions of in-copyright books and other library materials.
http://www.informationweek.com/news/internet/google/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=211601094Google to pay £80 million in online books settlement
Google Inc has reached a legal settlement with authors and major publishers that paves the way for readers to search through millions of copyrighted books online, browse passages and purchase copies.
http://uk.reuters.com/article/internetNews/idUKTRE49R72620081028
http://in.reuters.com/article/technologyNews/idINIndia-36188620081028Google settles copyright lawsuits with publishers, authors [IDG]
Google has settled lawsuits brought against it by major publishers and authors that argued that Google’s wholesale scanning and indexing of in-copyright books without permission amounted to massive copyright violations.The Authors Guild, the Association of American Publishers (AAP) and Google announced the settlement on Tuesday.
www.infoworld.com/article/08/10/28/Google_settles_copyright_lawsuits_with_publishers_authors_1.htmlMourning old media’s decline
The news that Google settled two longstanding suits with book authors and publishers over its plans to digitize the world’s great libraries suggests that some level of détente could be reached between old media and new.If true, it can’t come soon enough for the news business.It’s been an especially rotten few days for people who type on deadline. On Tuesday, The Christian Science Monitor announced that, after a century, it would cease publishing a weekday paper. Time Inc., the Olympian home of Time magazine, Fortune, People and Sports Illustrated, announced that it was cutting 600 jobs and reorganizing its staff. And Gannett, the largest newspaper publisher in the country, compounded the grimness by announcing it was laying off 10 percent of its work force — up to 3,000 people.
http://iht.com/articles/2008/10/29/business/29carr.php

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