Biggest BitTorrent Downloading Case in US History Targets 23,000 Defendants

At least 23,000 file sharers soon will likely get notified they are being sued for downloading the Expendables in what has become the single largest illegal-BitTorrent-downloading case in U.S. history.A federal judge in the case has agreed to allow the U.S. Copyright Group to subpoena internet service providers to find out the identity of everybody who had illegally downloaded the 2010 Sylvester Stallone flick — meaning the number of defendants is likely to dramatically increase as new purloiners are discovered. Once an ISP gets the subpoena, it usually notifies the account holder that his or her subscriber information is being turned over to the Copyright Group, which last year pioneered the practice of suing BitTorrent downloaders in the United States.
http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2011/05/biggest-bittorrent-case/Also see:Over 23,000 IP addresses cited in BitTorrent suit
A BitTorrent file-sharing case could soon have more than 23,000 defendants.Back in March, Judge Robert Wilkins of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia allowed Nu Image, a production company and the plaintiff in the case against “Does 1 to 6,500,” to start seeking out contact information, including full name and address, related to IP addresses it had already collected.
http://news.cnet.com/8301-13506_3-20061366-17.htmlCopyright Group to Sue 23,000 People this Week
People who downloaded “The Expendables” via BitTorrent file sharing better keep an eye on their mailbox this week, because they could be one of the more than 23,000 people targeted in an infringement lawsuit filed by the copyright bounty hunters at the U.S. Copyright Group.On March 17, a federal judge in the District of Columbia gave the USCG permission to demand from Internet Service Providers the name, current and permanent addresses, telephone numbers, e-mail, and device Media Access Control (MAC) addresses of those accused of copy infringement. Subpoenas are expected to go out this week, according to Wired.
http://www.pcworld.com/article/227500/.html

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