Arguments in Case Involving Net and Suicide: MySpace Suicide Case

Federal prosecutors in court on Wednesday depicted a woman accused of creating a phony account on MySpace to taunt a 13-year-old girl as cravenly preying on the “vulnerable” and “boy crazy” teenager, who had a history of depression and suicidal thoughts.The girl, Megan Meier, committed suicide, prosecutors said, after receiving nasty messages that she believed had come from a teenage boy but had actually been written by the accused woman, Lori Drew.In a highly unusual use of computer-fraud statutes, Ms. Drew is charged with conspiracy and three counts of accessing a computer without authorization via interstate commerce to obtain information to inflict emotional distress. Each count could lead to a maximum of five years in prison.
http://nytimes.com/2008/11/20/us/20myspace.htmlWoman Who Posed as Boy Testifies in Case That Ended in Suicide of 13-Year-Old
Slumping forward miserably in the witness box, in barely audible tones, a young woman told a federal jury here onThursday that she had posed as a teenage boy in a series of e-mail messages to a 13-year-old girl that ended in the girl’s expressing suicidal thoughts and hanging herself.”You’re the kind of boy a girl would kill herself over,” the woman, Ashley Grills, said the 13-year-old girl, Megan Meier, wrote before taking her own life.
http://nytimes.com/2008/11/21/us/21myspace.htmlFirst cyber-bullying trial hears how Megan Meier, 13, killed herself after online taunts
The mother of a 13-year-old girl described how her daughter hanged herself with a belt after being taunted on her MySpace page by a boy whose identity was later revealed to have been invented by a neighbour.Tina Meier recounted how “Josh Evans” befriended her 13-year-old daughter, Megan, online during the first day of the case against Lori Drew, who is accused of taking part in the internet hoax that prosecutors say led to Megan’s suicide.
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/us_and_americas/article5196441.eceMySpace Suicide Case Exposes Legal Gap
The prosecution of Missouri mother Lori Drew under a law designed for hackers has experts debating its validity. The hoax, which led to the suicide of 13-year-old Megan Meier, focuses a spotlight on the terms of service agreements between social networking sites and their users.Wondering where to find the nearest publicly available WiFi Internet access? Our global directory of more than 100,000 locations in 26 countries is a terrific tool for mobile computer users.So far, the testimony in the Lori Drew cyber-bullying trial, which began Wednesday in Los Angeles, has generated headlines for its inherent drama and tragedy: the mother of a teenage daughter, accused of using the MySpace social network to stage an elaborate hoax that ends with the suicide of a troubled 13-year-old classmate, Megan Meier.
http://www.ecommercetimes.com/story/65232.html

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