Victims of online bullying may be more likely to be depressed

Posted in: Child Protection&Online Safety at 22/09/2010 18:12

A study released Tuesday shows that as bullying has moved beyond the schoolyard and on to Facebook pages, online chat groups and cellphone text messages, its victims are feeling more hopeless and depressed.

"Traditional bullying is more face-to-face," said Ronald J. Iannotti, principal investigator for the study, published online in the Journal of Adolescent Health. It says that students targeted by cyber-bullies, who may not always identify themselves, "may be more likely to feel isolated, dehumanized or helpless at the time of the attack."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/09/21/AR2010092100038.html

Also see:

Cyber-bullying causes more depression, study finds
Cyber-bullying may be even harder on the victims than physical beatings or name-calling, U.S. researchers reported on Tuesday.

And unlike traditional bullies, cyber-bullies seem to be less depressed than their prey, the team at the National Institutes of Health found.
http://in.reuters.com/article/idINIndia-51628420100921
http://www.asiaone.com/Health/News/Story/A1Story20100921-238296.html

Sticks and stones may break my bones, but cyber-bullying really hurts...
Cyber-bullying may be even harder on victims than physical beatings or name-calling, according to a new study.

A team of researchers from the US National Institutes of Health have found that victims of cyber-bullying were more likely to feel isolated, dehumanised and helpless than victims of face-to-face confrontations.
www.news.com.au/technology/sticks-and-stones-may-break-my-bones-but-cyber-bullying-really-hurts-me/story-e6frfro0-1225927833343

Cyber bully victims hit with depression: survey [AFP]
School children bullied online face a high risk of being hit with real-world depression, according to a study released Tuesday by the US National Institutes of Health.

The "cyber bullying" findings deviated from studies of real-world bullying that indicated children who were bullies as well as being victims of the behavior were most likely to feel depressed, according to researchers.
http://au.news.yahoo.com/thewest/a/-/world/7992126/cyber-bully-victims-hit-with-depression-survey/
http://www.straitstimes.com/BreakingNews/TechandScience/Story/STIStory_581484.html
http://au.news.yahoo.com/thewest/lifestyle/a/-/lifestyle/7991249/depression-hits-cyber-bully-victims-study/
http://news.theage.com.au/breaking-news-world/cyber-bully-victims-hit-with-depression-20100922-15lsw.html
http://news.theage.com.au/breaking-news-technology/cyber-bully-victims-hit-with-depression-survey-20100922-15ltn.html
http://news.smh.com.au/breaking-news-technology/cyber-bully-victims-hit-with-depression-survey-20100922-15ltn.html

Cyber-bullying victims most depressed
Cyber-bullying may be even tougher for kids to handle than "traditional" bullying involving beatings, name-calling or social shunning, researchers have found.

Researchers with the U.S. National Institutes of Health's Institute of Child Health and Human Development have found that kids who are the targets of cyber-bullying at school are at greater risk for depression than are the youth who bully them -- a contrast to findings on traditional bullying.
http://www.ctv.ca/CTVNews/TopStories/20100921/cyber-bullying-100921/

Bullying victims likely to be depressed [UPI]
Youth who are the targets of cyber bullying at school are at greater risk for depression than are the bullies, U.S. researchers say.

Jing Wang, Tonja R. Nansel and Ronald J. Iannotti of the National Institutes of Health's Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development say their findings challenge earlier studies that found the highest depression scores are among bully-victims -- those who both bully others and but are also bullied themselves.
http://www.upi.com/Health_News/2010/09/21/Bullying-victims-likely-to-be-depressed/UPI-40221285123969/

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